Wellbeing and recovery in the emergency services: How do we care for those who care for us?

Kristen Hamling, Aaron Jarden

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

First responders (i.e. operational police officers, firefighters and ambulance officers) perform a critical role in our society, and as such we need them working at their best. In this chapter the authors posit that the wellbeing initiatives in many emergency service organisations are not aimed at first responders achieving their best, but instead, disproportionately, aimed at preventing their worst. Th at is, there is a greater emphasis on secondary and tertiary interventions that aim to prevent ill health and an incongruous emphasis on primary intervention aimed to promote good health. Applying evidence from the field of positive psychology, the authors propose that there is much to be gained in having a more balanced approach to first responder wellbeing.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWellbeing, Recovery and Mental Health
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages157-168
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781316339275
ISBN (Print)9781107543058
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Hamling, K., & Jarden, A. (2017). Wellbeing and recovery in the emergency services: How do we care for those who care for us? In Wellbeing, Recovery and Mental Health (pp. 157-168). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316339275.014