Unpacking High Self-Discharge Rates for Aboriginal Cardiac Patients

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Introduction: Aboriginal patients are over-represented in acute cardiac events. However, a significant number self discharge, jeopardising care and outcomes.
Method: Multivariate logistic regression analysis of South Australian (SA) hospital data to investigate self-discharge rates of CVD (ICD-10: I00-I99) in-patients, July 2010-June 2015. Interviews and focus groups with Aboriginal cardiac
patients, families, and staff at a metropolitan and rural hospital in SA.
Results: Aboriginal patients with a principal diagnosis of CVD are significantly more likely to self-discharge compared to non-Aboriginal patients (OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 3.3-5.1)(Fig 1). Potential reasons for self-discharge include: competing family and community obligations; a lack of communication on the importance of staying in hospital; grief, loss and fear; loneliness and dislocation from family and community, and; perceptions of inadequate or racist treatment. Active involvement of family, community and Aboriginal staff were key in reversing patient self-discharge.
Discussion: Given high rates of self-discharge amongst Aboriginal CVD patients in SA, there is significant work required to better support these patients to remain in hospital during treatment and recovery. Responsive strategies that enable culturally-competent care, two-way communication and involvement of family and community in care and decision making need to be implemented.

Conference

Conference65th Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Meeting
CountryAustralia
CityPerth
Period10/08/1713/08/17

Cite this

McBride, K., Kelly, J., Dowling, A., Keech, W., & Brown, A. (2017). Unpacking High Self-Discharge Rates for Aboriginal Cardiac Patients. Abstract from 65th Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Meeting , Perth, Australia.
McBride, Katharine ; Kelly, Janet ; Dowling, Anna ; Keech, Wendy ; Brown, Alex. / Unpacking High Self-Discharge Rates for Aboriginal Cardiac Patients. Abstract from 65th Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Meeting , Perth, Australia.
@conference{130e00679dfc42e0af6e4c20dcbba5bc,
title = "Unpacking High Self-Discharge Rates for Aboriginal Cardiac Patients",
abstract = "Introduction: Aboriginal patients are over-represented in acute cardiac events. However, a significant number self discharge, jeopardising care and outcomes.Method: Multivariate logistic regression analysis of South Australian (SA) hospital data to investigate self-discharge rates of CVD (ICD-10: I00-I99) in-patients, July 2010-June 2015. Interviews and focus groups with Aboriginal cardiacpatients, families, and staff at a metropolitan and rural hospital in SA.Results: Aboriginal patients with a principal diagnosis of CVD are significantly more likely to self-discharge compared to non-Aboriginal patients (OR: 4.1, 95{\%} CI: 3.3-5.1)(Fig 1). Potential reasons for self-discharge include: competing family and community obligations; a lack of communication on the importance of staying in hospital; grief, loss and fear; loneliness and dislocation from family and community, and; perceptions of inadequate or racist treatment. Active involvement of family, community and Aboriginal staff were key in reversing patient self-discharge. Discussion: Given high rates of self-discharge amongst Aboriginal CVD patients in SA, there is significant work required to better support these patients to remain in hospital during treatment and recovery. Responsive strategies that enable culturally-competent care, two-way communication and involvement of family and community in care and decision making need to be implemented.",
author = "Katharine McBride and Janet Kelly and Anna Dowling and Wendy Keech and Alex Brown",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
language = "English",
note = "65th Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Meeting ; Conference date: 10-08-2017 Through 13-08-2017",

}

McBride, K, Kelly, J, Dowling, A, Keech, W & Brown, A 2017, 'Unpacking High Self-Discharge Rates for Aboriginal Cardiac Patients' 65th Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Meeting , Perth, Australia, 10/08/17 - 13/08/17, .

Unpacking High Self-Discharge Rates for Aboriginal Cardiac Patients. / McBride, Katharine; Kelly, Janet; Dowling, Anna; Keech, Wendy; Brown, Alex.

2017. Abstract from 65th Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Meeting , Perth, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - Unpacking High Self-Discharge Rates for Aboriginal Cardiac Patients

AU - McBride, Katharine

AU - Kelly, Janet

AU - Dowling, Anna

AU - Keech, Wendy

AU - Brown, Alex

PY - 2017/8

Y1 - 2017/8

N2 - Introduction: Aboriginal patients are over-represented in acute cardiac events. However, a significant number self discharge, jeopardising care and outcomes.Method: Multivariate logistic regression analysis of South Australian (SA) hospital data to investigate self-discharge rates of CVD (ICD-10: I00-I99) in-patients, July 2010-June 2015. Interviews and focus groups with Aboriginal cardiacpatients, families, and staff at a metropolitan and rural hospital in SA.Results: Aboriginal patients with a principal diagnosis of CVD are significantly more likely to self-discharge compared to non-Aboriginal patients (OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 3.3-5.1)(Fig 1). Potential reasons for self-discharge include: competing family and community obligations; a lack of communication on the importance of staying in hospital; grief, loss and fear; loneliness and dislocation from family and community, and; perceptions of inadequate or racist treatment. Active involvement of family, community and Aboriginal staff were key in reversing patient self-discharge. Discussion: Given high rates of self-discharge amongst Aboriginal CVD patients in SA, there is significant work required to better support these patients to remain in hospital during treatment and recovery. Responsive strategies that enable culturally-competent care, two-way communication and involvement of family and community in care and decision making need to be implemented.

AB - Introduction: Aboriginal patients are over-represented in acute cardiac events. However, a significant number self discharge, jeopardising care and outcomes.Method: Multivariate logistic regression analysis of South Australian (SA) hospital data to investigate self-discharge rates of CVD (ICD-10: I00-I99) in-patients, July 2010-June 2015. Interviews and focus groups with Aboriginal cardiacpatients, families, and staff at a metropolitan and rural hospital in SA.Results: Aboriginal patients with a principal diagnosis of CVD are significantly more likely to self-discharge compared to non-Aboriginal patients (OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 3.3-5.1)(Fig 1). Potential reasons for self-discharge include: competing family and community obligations; a lack of communication on the importance of staying in hospital; grief, loss and fear; loneliness and dislocation from family and community, and; perceptions of inadequate or racist treatment. Active involvement of family, community and Aboriginal staff were key in reversing patient self-discharge. Discussion: Given high rates of self-discharge amongst Aboriginal CVD patients in SA, there is significant work required to better support these patients to remain in hospital during treatment and recovery. Responsive strategies that enable culturally-competent care, two-way communication and involvement of family and community in care and decision making need to be implemented.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

McBride K, Kelly J, Dowling A, Keech W, Brown A. Unpacking High Self-Discharge Rates for Aboriginal Cardiac Patients. 2017. Abstract from 65th Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Meeting , Perth, Australia.