Trends of mortality attributable to child and maternal undernutrition, overweight/obesity and dietary risk factors of non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa, 1990-2015: Findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015

Yohannes Adama Melaku, Tiffany Gill, Anne W. Taylor, Sarah L. Appleton, David Gonzalez-Chica, Robert Adams, Tom Achoki, Zumin Shi, Andre Renzaho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To assess trends of mortality attributable to child and maternal undernutrition (CMU), overweight/obesity and dietary risks of non-communicable diseases (NCD) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) using data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2015.Design For each risk factor, a systematic review of data was used to compute the exposure level and the effect size. A Bayesian hierarchical meta-regression analysis was used to estimate the exposure level of the risk factors by age, sex, geography and year. The burden of all-cause mortality attributable to CMU, fourteen dietary risk factors (eight diets, five nutrients and fibre intake) and overweight/obesity was estimated.Setting Sub-Saharan Africa.Participants All age groups and both sexes.Results In 2015, CMU, overweight/obesity and dietary risks of NCD accounted for 826204 (95 % uncertainty interval (UI) 737346, 923789), 266768 (95 % UI 189051, 353096) and 558578 (95 % UI 453433, 680197) deaths, respectively, representing 10·3 % (95 % UI 9·1, 11·6 %), 3·3 % (95 % UI 2·4, 4·4 %) and 7·0 % (95 % UI 5·8, 8·3 %) of all-cause mortality. While the age-standardized proportion of all-cause mortality accounted for by CMU decreased by 55·2 % between 1990 and 2015 in SSA, it increased by 63·3 and 17·2 % for overweight/obesity and dietary risks of NCD, respectively.Conclusions The increasing burden of diet- A nd obesity-related diseases and the reduction of mortality attributable to CMU indicate that SSA is undergoing a rapid nutritional transition. To tackle the impact in SSA, interventions and international development agendas should also target dietary risks associated with NCD and overweight/obesity.

LanguageEnglish
Pages827-840
Number of pages14
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019

Keywords

  • Child and maternal undernutrition
  • Dietary risks of non-communicable diseases
  • Double burden of malnutrition
  • Mortality
  • Overweight and/or obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{bbed8d823abc491cb29d907512faa6a1,
title = "Trends of mortality attributable to child and maternal undernutrition, overweight/obesity and dietary risk factors of non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa, 1990-2015: Findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015",
abstract = "Objective To assess trends of mortality attributable to child and maternal undernutrition (CMU), overweight/obesity and dietary risks of non-communicable diseases (NCD) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) using data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2015.Design For each risk factor, a systematic review of data was used to compute the exposure level and the effect size. A Bayesian hierarchical meta-regression analysis was used to estimate the exposure level of the risk factors by age, sex, geography and year. The burden of all-cause mortality attributable to CMU, fourteen dietary risk factors (eight diets, five nutrients and fibre intake) and overweight/obesity was estimated.Setting Sub-Saharan Africa.Participants All age groups and both sexes.Results In 2015, CMU, overweight/obesity and dietary risks of NCD accounted for 826204 (95 {\%} uncertainty interval (UI) 737346, 923789), 266768 (95 {\%} UI 189051, 353096) and 558578 (95 {\%} UI 453433, 680197) deaths, respectively, representing 10·3 {\%} (95 {\%} UI 9·1, 11·6 {\%}), 3·3 {\%} (95 {\%} UI 2·4, 4·4 {\%}) and 7·0 {\%} (95 {\%} UI 5·8, 8·3 {\%}) of all-cause mortality. While the age-standardized proportion of all-cause mortality accounted for by CMU decreased by 55·2 {\%} between 1990 and 2015 in SSA, it increased by 63·3 and 17·2 {\%} for overweight/obesity and dietary risks of NCD, respectively.Conclusions The increasing burden of diet- A nd obesity-related diseases and the reduction of mortality attributable to CMU indicate that SSA is undergoing a rapid nutritional transition. To tackle the impact in SSA, interventions and international development agendas should also target dietary risks associated with NCD and overweight/obesity.",
keywords = "Child and maternal undernutrition, Dietary risks of non-communicable diseases, Double burden of malnutrition, Mortality, Overweight and/or obesity",
author = "Melaku, {Yohannes Adama} and Tiffany Gill and Taylor, {Anne W.} and Appleton, {Sarah L.} and David Gonzalez-Chica and Robert Adams and Tom Achoki and Zumin Shi and Andre Renzaho",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S1368980018002975",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "827--840",
journal = "Public Health Nutrition",
issn = "1368-9800",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trends of mortality attributable to child and maternal undernutrition, overweight/obesity and dietary risk factors of non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa, 1990-2015

T2 - Public Health Nutrition

AU - Melaku, Yohannes Adama

AU - Gill, Tiffany

AU - Taylor, Anne W.

AU - Appleton, Sarah L.

AU - Gonzalez-Chica, David

AU - Adams, Robert

AU - Achoki, Tom

AU - Shi, Zumin

AU - Renzaho, Andre

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Objective To assess trends of mortality attributable to child and maternal undernutrition (CMU), overweight/obesity and dietary risks of non-communicable diseases (NCD) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) using data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2015.Design For each risk factor, a systematic review of data was used to compute the exposure level and the effect size. A Bayesian hierarchical meta-regression analysis was used to estimate the exposure level of the risk factors by age, sex, geography and year. The burden of all-cause mortality attributable to CMU, fourteen dietary risk factors (eight diets, five nutrients and fibre intake) and overweight/obesity was estimated.Setting Sub-Saharan Africa.Participants All age groups and both sexes.Results In 2015, CMU, overweight/obesity and dietary risks of NCD accounted for 826204 (95 % uncertainty interval (UI) 737346, 923789), 266768 (95 % UI 189051, 353096) and 558578 (95 % UI 453433, 680197) deaths, respectively, representing 10·3 % (95 % UI 9·1, 11·6 %), 3·3 % (95 % UI 2·4, 4·4 %) and 7·0 % (95 % UI 5·8, 8·3 %) of all-cause mortality. While the age-standardized proportion of all-cause mortality accounted for by CMU decreased by 55·2 % between 1990 and 2015 in SSA, it increased by 63·3 and 17·2 % for overweight/obesity and dietary risks of NCD, respectively.Conclusions The increasing burden of diet- A nd obesity-related diseases and the reduction of mortality attributable to CMU indicate that SSA is undergoing a rapid nutritional transition. To tackle the impact in SSA, interventions and international development agendas should also target dietary risks associated with NCD and overweight/obesity.

AB - Objective To assess trends of mortality attributable to child and maternal undernutrition (CMU), overweight/obesity and dietary risks of non-communicable diseases (NCD) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) using data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2015.Design For each risk factor, a systematic review of data was used to compute the exposure level and the effect size. A Bayesian hierarchical meta-regression analysis was used to estimate the exposure level of the risk factors by age, sex, geography and year. The burden of all-cause mortality attributable to CMU, fourteen dietary risk factors (eight diets, five nutrients and fibre intake) and overweight/obesity was estimated.Setting Sub-Saharan Africa.Participants All age groups and both sexes.Results In 2015, CMU, overweight/obesity and dietary risks of NCD accounted for 826204 (95 % uncertainty interval (UI) 737346, 923789), 266768 (95 % UI 189051, 353096) and 558578 (95 % UI 453433, 680197) deaths, respectively, representing 10·3 % (95 % UI 9·1, 11·6 %), 3·3 % (95 % UI 2·4, 4·4 %) and 7·0 % (95 % UI 5·8, 8·3 %) of all-cause mortality. While the age-standardized proportion of all-cause mortality accounted for by CMU decreased by 55·2 % between 1990 and 2015 in SSA, it increased by 63·3 and 17·2 % for overweight/obesity and dietary risks of NCD, respectively.Conclusions The increasing burden of diet- A nd obesity-related diseases and the reduction of mortality attributable to CMU indicate that SSA is undergoing a rapid nutritional transition. To tackle the impact in SSA, interventions and international development agendas should also target dietary risks associated with NCD and overweight/obesity.

KW - Child and maternal undernutrition

KW - Dietary risks of non-communicable diseases

KW - Double burden of malnutrition

KW - Mortality

KW - Overweight and/or obesity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85057952538&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1368980018002975

DO - 10.1017/S1368980018002975

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 827

EP - 840

JO - Public Health Nutrition

JF - Public Health Nutrition

SN - 1368-9800

IS - 5

ER -