The rising prevalence of diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance: The Australian diabetes, obesity and lifestyle study

David W. Dunstan, Paul Z. Zimmet, Timothy A. Welborn, Maximilian P. De Courten, Adrian J. Cameron, Richard A. Sicree, Terry Dwyer, Stephen Colagiuri, Damien Jolley, Matthew Knuiman, Robert Atkins, Jonathan E. Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

686 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To determine the population-based prevalence of diabetes and other categories of glucose intolerance (impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and impaired fasting glucose [IFG]) in Australia and to compare the prevalence with previous Australian data. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A national sample involving 11,247 participants aged ≥25 years living in 42 randomly selected areas from the six states and the Northern Territory were examined in a cross-sectional survey using the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test to assess fasting and 2-h plasma glucose concentrations. The World Health Organization diagnostic criteria were used to determine the prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance. RESULTS - The prevalence of diabetes in Australia was 8.0% in men and 6.8% in women, and an additional 17.4% of men and 15.4% of women had IGT or IFG. Even in the youngest age group (25-34 years), 5.7% of subjects had abnormal glucose tolerance. The overall diabetes prevalence in Australia was 7.4%, and an additional 16.4% had IGT or IFG. Diabetes prevalence has more than doubled since 1981, and this is only partially explained by changes in age profile and obesity. CONCLUSIONS - Australia has a rapidly rising prevalence of diabetes and other categories of abnormal glucose tolerance. The prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance in Australia is one of the highest yet reported from a developed nation with a predominantly Europid background.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)829-834
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

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