The regulation of peripheral metabolism by gut-derived hormones

Emily W.L. Sun, Alyce M. Martin, Richard Young, Damien J. Keating

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Enteroendocrine cells lining the gut epithelium constitute the largest endocrine organ in the body and secrete over 20 different hormones in response to cues from ingested foods and changes in nutritional status. Not only do these hormones convey signals from the gut to the brain via the gut-brain axis, they also act directly on metabolically important peripheral targets in a highly concerted fashion to maintain energy balance and glucose homeostasis. Gut-derived hormones released during fasting tend to be orexigenic and have hyperglycaemic potential. Conversely, gut hormones secreted postprandially generally promote satiety and facilitate glucose clearance. Although some of the metabolic benefits conferred by bariatric surgeries have been ascribed to changes in the secretory profiles of various gut hormones, the therapeutic potential of the enteroendocrine system as a viable target against metabolic diseases remain largely underexploited, except for incretin-mimetics. This review provides a brief overview of the physiological importance and highlights the therapeutic potential of the following gut hormones: serotonin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, oxyntomodulin, peptide YY, insulin-like peptide 5, and ghrelin.

LanguageEnglish
JournalFrontiers in Endocrinology
Volume10
Issue numberJAN
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Enteroendocine cells
  • GIP-glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide
  • GLP-1
  • Ghrelin
  • Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5)
  • Oxyntomodulin
  • PYY
  • Serotonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Sun, Emily W.L. ; Martin, Alyce M. ; Young, Richard ; Keating, Damien J. / The regulation of peripheral metabolism by gut-derived hormones. In: Frontiers in Endocrinology. 2019 ; Vol. 10, No. JAN.
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The regulation of peripheral metabolism by gut-derived hormones. / Sun, Emily W.L.; Martin, Alyce M.; Young, Richard; Keating, Damien J.

In: Frontiers in Endocrinology, Vol. 10, No. JAN, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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