The longitudinal association between inflammation and incident depressive symptoms in men: The effects of hs-CRP are independent of abdominal obesity and metabolic disturbances

Phillip J. Tully, Harald Baumeister, Jürgen Bengel, Alicia Jenkins, Andrzej Januszewski, Sean Martin, Gary A. Wittert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This cohort study evaluates whether the association between low-grade inflammation and incident depressive symptoms is independent of abdominal obesity and metabolic disturbances. Methods: A cohort of 1167 non-depressed men aged 35 to 80 years were followed up over 5 years to assess incident depressive symptoms measured by the Centre for Epidemiology Scale-Depression or Beck Depression Inventory-I. Venous tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were quantified at baseline and 5 years. Logistic regression determined whether hsCRP, IL-6 and TNF-α were associated with incident depressive symptoms independent of abdominal obesity and metabolic factors. Ancillary analysis utilizing depression z scores stratified participants by waist circumference ≥ 102 cm and ≥ 2 metabolic disturbances. Results: Incident depressive symptoms occurred in 95 men at 5 years (8.14% of total). Clinically relevant depressive symptoms were associated with baseline hsCRP (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95% CI 1.00-1.07, p = .03) and annualized δhsCRP (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95% CI 1.01-1.08, p = .02). Ancillary analysis showed that the association between annualized δhsCRP and depression z score was only significant in men with waist circumference < 102 cm (β = .19, p < .001) and ≤ 1 metabolic disturbance (β = .18, p < .001). None of the measured cytokines were significantly associated with depression. Conclusions: hsCRP and annualized δhsCRP were positively associated with depressive symptoms in a cohort of men. Further investigation into the role of abdominal obesity and metabolic disturbances in the inflammation-depression hypothesis is warranted.

LanguageEnglish
Pages328-335
Number of pages8
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume139
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2015

Keywords

  • Abdominal adiposity
  • Body mass index
  • C-reactive protein
  • Depression
  • Inflammation
  • Interleukin-6
  • Longitudinal
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Obesity
  • Tumor necrosis factor-alpha

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

@article{68d1a95a807349e7b54f539b4cabd4ae,
title = "The longitudinal association between inflammation and incident depressive symptoms in men: The effects of hs-CRP are independent of abdominal obesity and metabolic disturbances",
abstract = "Background: This cohort study evaluates whether the association between low-grade inflammation and incident depressive symptoms is independent of abdominal obesity and metabolic disturbances. Methods: A cohort of 1167 non-depressed men aged 35 to 80 years were followed up over 5 years to assess incident depressive symptoms measured by the Centre for Epidemiology Scale-Depression or Beck Depression Inventory-I. Venous tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were quantified at baseline and 5 years. Logistic regression determined whether hsCRP, IL-6 and TNF-α were associated with incident depressive symptoms independent of abdominal obesity and metabolic factors. Ancillary analysis utilizing depression z scores stratified participants by waist circumference ≥ 102 cm and ≥ 2 metabolic disturbances. Results: Incident depressive symptoms occurred in 95 men at 5 years (8.14{\%} of total). Clinically relevant depressive symptoms were associated with baseline hsCRP (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95{\%} CI 1.00-1.07, p = .03) and annualized δhsCRP (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95{\%} CI 1.01-1.08, p = .02). Ancillary analysis showed that the association between annualized δhsCRP and depression z score was only significant in men with waist circumference < 102 cm (β = .19, p < .001) and ≤ 1 metabolic disturbance (β = .18, p < .001). None of the measured cytokines were significantly associated with depression. Conclusions: hsCRP and annualized δhsCRP were positively associated with depressive symptoms in a cohort of men. Further investigation into the role of abdominal obesity and metabolic disturbances in the inflammation-depression hypothesis is warranted.",
keywords = "Abdominal adiposity, Body mass index, C-reactive protein, Depression, Inflammation, Interleukin-6, Longitudinal, Metabolic syndrome, Obesity, Tumor necrosis factor-alpha",
author = "Tully, {Phillip J.} and Harald Baumeister and J{\"u}rgen Bengel and Alicia Jenkins and Andrzej Januszewski and Sean Martin and Wittert, {Gary A.}",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.11.058",
language = "English",
volume = "139",
pages = "328--335",
journal = "Physiology and Behavior",
issn = "0031-9384",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

The longitudinal association between inflammation and incident depressive symptoms in men : The effects of hs-CRP are independent of abdominal obesity and metabolic disturbances. / Tully, Phillip J.; Baumeister, Harald; Bengel, Jürgen; Jenkins, Alicia; Januszewski, Andrzej; Martin, Sean; Wittert, Gary A.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 139, 01.02.2015, p. 328-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The longitudinal association between inflammation and incident depressive symptoms in men

T2 - Physiology and Behavior

AU - Tully, Phillip J.

AU - Baumeister, Harald

AU - Bengel, Jürgen

AU - Jenkins, Alicia

AU - Januszewski, Andrzej

AU - Martin, Sean

AU - Wittert, Gary A.

PY - 2015/2/1

Y1 - 2015/2/1

N2 - Background: This cohort study evaluates whether the association between low-grade inflammation and incident depressive symptoms is independent of abdominal obesity and metabolic disturbances. Methods: A cohort of 1167 non-depressed men aged 35 to 80 years were followed up over 5 years to assess incident depressive symptoms measured by the Centre for Epidemiology Scale-Depression or Beck Depression Inventory-I. Venous tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were quantified at baseline and 5 years. Logistic regression determined whether hsCRP, IL-6 and TNF-α were associated with incident depressive symptoms independent of abdominal obesity and metabolic factors. Ancillary analysis utilizing depression z scores stratified participants by waist circumference ≥ 102 cm and ≥ 2 metabolic disturbances. Results: Incident depressive symptoms occurred in 95 men at 5 years (8.14% of total). Clinically relevant depressive symptoms were associated with baseline hsCRP (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95% CI 1.00-1.07, p = .03) and annualized δhsCRP (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95% CI 1.01-1.08, p = .02). Ancillary analysis showed that the association between annualized δhsCRP and depression z score was only significant in men with waist circumference < 102 cm (β = .19, p < .001) and ≤ 1 metabolic disturbance (β = .18, p < .001). None of the measured cytokines were significantly associated with depression. Conclusions: hsCRP and annualized δhsCRP were positively associated with depressive symptoms in a cohort of men. Further investigation into the role of abdominal obesity and metabolic disturbances in the inflammation-depression hypothesis is warranted.

AB - Background: This cohort study evaluates whether the association between low-grade inflammation and incident depressive symptoms is independent of abdominal obesity and metabolic disturbances. Methods: A cohort of 1167 non-depressed men aged 35 to 80 years were followed up over 5 years to assess incident depressive symptoms measured by the Centre for Epidemiology Scale-Depression or Beck Depression Inventory-I. Venous tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were quantified at baseline and 5 years. Logistic regression determined whether hsCRP, IL-6 and TNF-α were associated with incident depressive symptoms independent of abdominal obesity and metabolic factors. Ancillary analysis utilizing depression z scores stratified participants by waist circumference ≥ 102 cm and ≥ 2 metabolic disturbances. Results: Incident depressive symptoms occurred in 95 men at 5 years (8.14% of total). Clinically relevant depressive symptoms were associated with baseline hsCRP (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95% CI 1.00-1.07, p = .03) and annualized δhsCRP (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95% CI 1.01-1.08, p = .02). Ancillary analysis showed that the association between annualized δhsCRP and depression z score was only significant in men with waist circumference < 102 cm (β = .19, p < .001) and ≤ 1 metabolic disturbance (β = .18, p < .001). None of the measured cytokines were significantly associated with depression. Conclusions: hsCRP and annualized δhsCRP were positively associated with depressive symptoms in a cohort of men. Further investigation into the role of abdominal obesity and metabolic disturbances in the inflammation-depression hypothesis is warranted.

KW - Abdominal adiposity

KW - Body mass index

KW - C-reactive protein

KW - Depression

KW - Inflammation

KW - Interleukin-6

KW - Longitudinal

KW - Metabolic syndrome

KW - Obesity

KW - Tumor necrosis factor-alpha

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84912097018&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.11.058

DO - 10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.11.058

M3 - Article

VL - 139

SP - 328

EP - 335

JO - Physiology and Behavior

JF - Physiology and Behavior

SN - 0031-9384

ER -