The influence of maternal BMI and gestational diabetes on pregnancy outcome

K E Martin, Rosalie M. Grivell, L N Yelland, Jodie M. Dodd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Decreased risk of fetal macrosomia in this group of women is likely to reflect the effect of GDM treatment. Aims: To evaluate the effect of maternal body mass index (BMI) on gestational diabetes (GDM) and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women who are overweight or obese. Methods: A prospective cohort study nested within the LIMIT randomised controlled trial. A total of 1030 women were recruited between 10 and 20 weeks' gestation, with a BMI≥25kg/m2, and were grouped into BMI subclasses utilising World Health Organisation criteria. Women underwent a fasting oral glucose tolerance test at 26-28 weeks' gestation, and a diagnosis of GDM was made if fasting blood glucose was ≥5.5mmol/L or ≥7.8mmol/L after 2h. Maternal and neonatal health outcomes were evaluated. Results: The prevalence of GDM increased with increasing maternal BMI (6.74% overweight vs 13.42% obese subclass 1 vs 12.79% obese subclass 2 vs 20.00% obese subclass 3). Women who were diagnosed with GDM were significantly less likely to give birth to an infant with birth weight above 4. kg (RR 0.60; 95% CI 0.36 to 1.00; p=. 0.05). The need for caesarean delivery (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.50; p=. 0.006) and incidence of birth weight >90% (RR 1.38; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.77; p=. 0.01) was significantly increased in women who were obese, independent of GDM. Conclusion: Increasing maternal BMI is a significant risk factor for the development of GDM, and our findings demonstrate a considerably higher prevalence than has been previously described. Raised maternal BMI is a risk factor for high infant birth weight, which may be modified by lifestyle intervention. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
LanguageEnglish
Pages508-513
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume108
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Martin, K E ; Grivell, Rosalie M. ; Yelland, L N ; Dodd, Jodie M. / The influence of maternal BMI and gestational diabetes on pregnancy outcome. In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 2015 ; Vol. 108, No. 3. pp. 508-513.
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abstract = "Decreased risk of fetal macrosomia in this group of women is likely to reflect the effect of GDM treatment. Aims: To evaluate the effect of maternal body mass index (BMI) on gestational diabetes (GDM) and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women who are overweight or obese. Methods: A prospective cohort study nested within the LIMIT randomised controlled trial. A total of 1030 women were recruited between 10 and 20 weeks' gestation, with a BMI≥25kg/m2, and were grouped into BMI subclasses utilising World Health Organisation criteria. Women underwent a fasting oral glucose tolerance test at 26-28 weeks' gestation, and a diagnosis of GDM was made if fasting blood glucose was ≥5.5mmol/L or ≥7.8mmol/L after 2h. Maternal and neonatal health outcomes were evaluated. Results: The prevalence of GDM increased with increasing maternal BMI (6.74{\%} overweight vs 13.42{\%} obese subclass 1 vs 12.79{\%} obese subclass 2 vs 20.00{\%} obese subclass 3). Women who were diagnosed with GDM were significantly less likely to give birth to an infant with birth weight above 4. kg (RR 0.60; 95{\%} CI 0.36 to 1.00; p=. 0.05). The need for caesarean delivery (RR 1.27; 95{\%} CI 1.07 to 1.50; p=. 0.006) and incidence of birth weight >90{\%} (RR 1.38; 95{\%} CI 1.07 to 1.77; p=. 0.01) was significantly increased in women who were obese, independent of GDM. Conclusion: Increasing maternal BMI is a significant risk factor for the development of GDM, and our findings demonstrate a considerably higher prevalence than has been previously described. Raised maternal BMI is a risk factor for high infant birth weight, which may be modified by lifestyle intervention. {\circledC} 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.",
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The influence of maternal BMI and gestational diabetes on pregnancy outcome. / Martin, K E; Grivell, Rosalie M.; Yelland, L N; Dodd, Jodie M.

In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 108, No. 3, 2015, p. 508-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of maternal BMI and gestational diabetes on pregnancy outcome

AU - Martin, K E

AU - Grivell, Rosalie M.

AU - Yelland, L N

AU - Dodd, Jodie M.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Decreased risk of fetal macrosomia in this group of women is likely to reflect the effect of GDM treatment. Aims: To evaluate the effect of maternal body mass index (BMI) on gestational diabetes (GDM) and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women who are overweight or obese. Methods: A prospective cohort study nested within the LIMIT randomised controlled trial. A total of 1030 women were recruited between 10 and 20 weeks' gestation, with a BMI≥25kg/m2, and were grouped into BMI subclasses utilising World Health Organisation criteria. Women underwent a fasting oral glucose tolerance test at 26-28 weeks' gestation, and a diagnosis of GDM was made if fasting blood glucose was ≥5.5mmol/L or ≥7.8mmol/L after 2h. Maternal and neonatal health outcomes were evaluated. Results: The prevalence of GDM increased with increasing maternal BMI (6.74% overweight vs 13.42% obese subclass 1 vs 12.79% obese subclass 2 vs 20.00% obese subclass 3). Women who were diagnosed with GDM were significantly less likely to give birth to an infant with birth weight above 4. kg (RR 0.60; 95% CI 0.36 to 1.00; p=. 0.05). The need for caesarean delivery (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.50; p=. 0.006) and incidence of birth weight >90% (RR 1.38; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.77; p=. 0.01) was significantly increased in women who were obese, independent of GDM. Conclusion: Increasing maternal BMI is a significant risk factor for the development of GDM, and our findings demonstrate a considerably higher prevalence than has been previously described. Raised maternal BMI is a risk factor for high infant birth weight, which may be modified by lifestyle intervention. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

AB - Decreased risk of fetal macrosomia in this group of women is likely to reflect the effect of GDM treatment. Aims: To evaluate the effect of maternal body mass index (BMI) on gestational diabetes (GDM) and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women who are overweight or obese. Methods: A prospective cohort study nested within the LIMIT randomised controlled trial. A total of 1030 women were recruited between 10 and 20 weeks' gestation, with a BMI≥25kg/m2, and were grouped into BMI subclasses utilising World Health Organisation criteria. Women underwent a fasting oral glucose tolerance test at 26-28 weeks' gestation, and a diagnosis of GDM was made if fasting blood glucose was ≥5.5mmol/L or ≥7.8mmol/L after 2h. Maternal and neonatal health outcomes were evaluated. Results: The prevalence of GDM increased with increasing maternal BMI (6.74% overweight vs 13.42% obese subclass 1 vs 12.79% obese subclass 2 vs 20.00% obese subclass 3). Women who were diagnosed with GDM were significantly less likely to give birth to an infant with birth weight above 4. kg (RR 0.60; 95% CI 0.36 to 1.00; p=. 0.05). The need for caesarean delivery (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.50; p=. 0.006) and incidence of birth weight >90% (RR 1.38; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.77; p=. 0.01) was significantly increased in women who were obese, independent of GDM. Conclusion: Increasing maternal BMI is a significant risk factor for the development of GDM, and our findings demonstrate a considerably higher prevalence than has been previously described. Raised maternal BMI is a risk factor for high infant birth weight, which may be modified by lifestyle intervention. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

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DO - 10.1016/j.diabres.2014.12.015

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JO - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

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JF - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

SN - 0168-8227

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ER -