The impact of low muscle mass definition on the prevalence of sarcopenia in older australians

Solomon Yu, Sarah Appleton, Robert Adams, Ian Chapman, Gary Wittert, Thavarajah Visvanathan, Renuka Visvanathan

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22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Sarcopenia is the presence of low muscle mass and low muscle function. The aim of this study was to establish cutoffs for low muscle mass using three published methods and to compare the prevalence of sarcopenia in older Australians. Methods. Gender specific cutoffs levels were identified for low muscle mass using three different methods. Low grip strength was determined using established cutoffs of <30 kg for men and <20 kg for women to estimate the prevalence of sarcopenia. Results. Gender specific cutoffs levels for low muscle mass identified were (a) <6.89 kg/m2 for men and <4.32 kg/m2 for women, <2 standard deviation (SD) of a young reference population; (b) <7.36 kg/m2 for men and <5.81 kg/m2 for women from the lowest 20% percentile of the older group; and (c) <-2.15 for men and <-1.42 for women from the lowest 20% of the residuals of linear regressions of appendicular skeletal mass, adjusted for fat mass and height. Prevalence of sarcopenia in older (65 years and older) people by these three methods for men was 2.5%, 6.2%, and 6.4% and for women 0.3%, 9.3%, and 8.5%, respectively. Conclusions. Sarcopenia is common but consensus on the best method to confirm low muscle mass is required.

Original languageEnglish
Article number361790
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished or Issued - 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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