The genetic basis of cerebral palsy

Michael C. Fahey, Alastair H. Maclennan, Doris Kretzschmar, Jozef Gecz, Michael C. Kruer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although prematurity and hypoxic–ischaemic injury are well-recognized contributors to the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy (CP), as many as one-third of children with CP may lack traditional risk factors. For many of these children, a genetic basis to their condition is suspected. Recent findings have implicated copy number variants and mutations in single genes in children with CP. Current studies are limited by relatively small patient numbers, the underlying genetic heterogeneity identified, and the paucity of validation studies that have been performed. However, several genes mapping to intersecting pathways controlling neurodevelopment and neuronal connectivity have been identified. Analogous to other neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and intellectual disability, the genomic architecture of CP is likely to be highly complex. Although we are just beginning to understand genetic contributions to CP, new insights are anticipated to serve as a unique window into the neurobiology of CP and suggest new targets for intervention.

LanguageEnglish
Pages462-469
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume59
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Fahey, M. C., Maclennan, A. H., Kretzschmar, D., Gecz, J., & Kruer, M. C. (2017). The genetic basis of cerebral palsy. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 59(5), 462-469. https://doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.13363
Fahey, Michael C. ; Maclennan, Alastair H. ; Kretzschmar, Doris ; Gecz, Jozef ; Kruer, Michael C. / The genetic basis of cerebral palsy. In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. 2017 ; Vol. 59, No. 5. pp. 462-469.
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Fahey, MC, Maclennan, AH, Kretzschmar, D, Gecz, J & Kruer, MC 2017, 'The genetic basis of cerebral palsy', Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, vol. 59, no. 5, pp. 462-469. https://doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.13363

The genetic basis of cerebral palsy. / Fahey, Michael C.; Maclennan, Alastair H.; Kretzschmar, Doris; Gecz, Jozef; Kruer, Michael C.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 59, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 462-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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