The effect of weight loss on anti-Müllerian hormone levels in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome and reproductive impairment

R. L. Thomson, J. D. Buckley, L. J. Moran, M. Noakes, P. M. Clifton, R. J. Norman, G. D. Brinkworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUNDAnti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) has been proposed as a clinical predictor of improvements in reproductive function following weight loss in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This study aimed to assess whether baseline and/or change in AMH levels with weight loss predict improvements in reproductive function in overweight and obese women with PCOS.METHODSFifty-two overweight and obese women with PCOS and reproductive impairment (age 29.8 ± 0.8 years, BMI 36.5 ± 0.7 kg/m2) followed a 20-week weight loss programme. AMH, weight, menstrual cyclicity and ovulatory function were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. RESULTSParticipants who responded with improvements in reproductive function (n = 26) had lower baseline AMH levels (23.5 ± 3.7 versus 32.5 ± 2.9 pmol/l; P = 0.03) and experienced greater weight loss (-11.7 ± 1.2 versus -6.4 ± 0.9 kg; P = 0.001) compared with those who did not respond (n = 26). Logistic regression analysis showed that weight loss and baseline AMH were independently related to improvements in reproductive function (P = 0.002 and P = 0.013, respectively). AMH levels did not change with weight loss in both responders and non-responders.CONCLUSIONSIn overweight and obese women with PCOS and reproductive dysfunction, a 20-week weight loss intervention resulted in improvements in reproductive function but no change in AMH levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1976-1981
Number of pages6
JournalHuman Reproduction
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

Keywords

  • Anti-Müllerian hormone
  • Menstrual cyclicity
  • Reproductive function
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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