The Early Growth Genetics (EGG) and EArly Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortia: design, results and future prospects

EArly Genetics Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium, Early Growth Genetics (EGG) Consortium, Christel M. Middeldorp, Janine F. Felix, Anubha Mahajan, Tarunveer S. Ahluwalia, Juha Auvinen, Meike Bartels, Jose Ramon Bilbao, Hans Bisgaard, Klaus Bønnelykke, Dorret I. Boomsma, Jonathan P. Bradfield, Mariona Bustamante, Zhanghua Chen, John A. Curtin, Adnan Custovic, George Davey Smith, Gareth E. Davies, Liesbeth Duijts & 31 others Peter R. Eastwood, Anders U. Eliasen, Xavier Estivill, David M. Evans, Iryna O. Fedko, W. James Gauderman, Frank Gilliland, Raquel Granell, Struan F.A. Grant, Monica Guxens, Hakon Hakonarson, Catharina A. Hartman, Joachim Heinrich, Anjali K. Henders, John Henderson, Patrick Holt, Jouke Jan Hottenga, Carmen Iñíguez, Elina Hypponen, Vincent W.V. Jaddoe, Marjo Riitta Järvelin, Astanand Jugessur, Mika Kähönen, Jaakko Kaprio, Ville Karhunen, John P. Kemp, Gerard H. Koppelman, Ashish Kumar, Jari Lahti, Henrik Larsson, Debbie A. Lawlor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The impact of many unfavorable childhood traits or diseases, such as low birth weight and mental disorders, is not limited to childhood and adolescence, as they are also associated with poor outcomes in adulthood, such as cardiovascular disease. Insight into the genetic etiology of childhood and adolescent traits and disorders may therefore provide new perspectives, not only on how to improve wellbeing during childhood, but also how to prevent later adverse outcomes. To achieve the sample sizes required for genetic research, the Early Growth Genetics (EGG) and EArly Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortia were established. The majority of the participating cohorts are longitudinal population-based samples, but other cohorts with data on early childhood phenotypes are also involved. Cohorts often have a broad focus and collect(ed) data on various somatic and psychiatric traits as well as environmental factors. Genetic variants have been successfully identified for multiple traits, for example, birth weight, atopic dermatitis, childhood BMI, allergic sensitization, and pubertal growth. Furthermore, the results have shown that genetic factors also partly underlie the association with adult traits. As sample sizes are still increasing, it is expected that future analyses will identify additional variants. This, in combination with the development of innovative statistical methods, will provide detailed insight on the mechanisms underlying the transition from childhood to adult disorders. Both consortia welcome new collaborations. Policies and contact details are available from the corresponding authors of this manuscript and/or the consortium websites.

LanguageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Epidemiology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Childhood traits and disorders
  • Consortium
  • Genetics
  • Longitudinal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

EArly Genetics Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium ; Early Growth Genetics (EGG) Consortium. / The Early Growth Genetics (EGG) and EArly Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortia : design, results and future prospects. In: European Journal of Epidemiology. 2019.
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abstract = "The impact of many unfavorable childhood traits or diseases, such as low birth weight and mental disorders, is not limited to childhood and adolescence, as they are also associated with poor outcomes in adulthood, such as cardiovascular disease. Insight into the genetic etiology of childhood and adolescent traits and disorders may therefore provide new perspectives, not only on how to improve wellbeing during childhood, but also how to prevent later adverse outcomes. To achieve the sample sizes required for genetic research, the Early Growth Genetics (EGG) and EArly Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortia were established. The majority of the participating cohorts are longitudinal population-based samples, but other cohorts with data on early childhood phenotypes are also involved. Cohorts often have a broad focus and collect(ed) data on various somatic and psychiatric traits as well as environmental factors. Genetic variants have been successfully identified for multiple traits, for example, birth weight, atopic dermatitis, childhood BMI, allergic sensitization, and pubertal growth. Furthermore, the results have shown that genetic factors also partly underlie the association with adult traits. As sample sizes are still increasing, it is expected that future analyses will identify additional variants. This, in combination with the development of innovative statistical methods, will provide detailed insight on the mechanisms underlying the transition from childhood to adult disorders. Both consortia welcome new collaborations. Policies and contact details are available from the corresponding authors of this manuscript and/or the consortium websites.",
keywords = "Childhood traits and disorders, Consortium, Genetics, Longitudinal",
author = "{EArly Genetics Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium} and {Early Growth Genetics (EGG) Consortium} and Middeldorp, {Christel M.} and Felix, {Janine F.} and Anubha Mahajan and Ahluwalia, {Tarunveer S.} and Juha Auvinen and Meike Bartels and Bilbao, {Jose Ramon} and Hans Bisgaard and Klaus B{\o}nnelykke and Boomsma, {Dorret I.} and Bradfield, {Jonathan P.} and Mariona Bustamante and Zhanghua Chen and Curtin, {John A.} and Adnan Custovic and Smith, {George Davey} and Davies, {Gareth E.} and Liesbeth Duijts and Eastwood, {Peter R.} and Eliasen, {Anders U.} and Xavier Estivill and Evans, {David M.} and Fedko, {Iryna O.} and Gauderman, {W. James} and Frank Gilliland and Raquel Granell and Grant, {Struan F.A.} and Monica Guxens and Hakon Hakonarson and Hartman, {Catharina A.} and Joachim Heinrich and Henders, {Anjali K.} and John Henderson and Patrick Holt and Hottenga, {Jouke Jan} and Carmen I{\~n}{\'i}guez and Elina Hypponen and Jaddoe, {Vincent W.V.} and J{\"a}rvelin, {Marjo Riitta} and Astanand Jugessur and Mika K{\"a}h{\"o}nen and Jaakko Kaprio and Ville Karhunen and Kemp, {John P.} and Koppelman, {Gerard H.} and Ashish Kumar and Jari Lahti and Henrik Larsson and Lawlor, {Debbie A.}",
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The Early Growth Genetics (EGG) and EArly Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortia : design, results and future prospects. / EArly Genetics Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium; Early Growth Genetics (EGG) Consortium.

In: European Journal of Epidemiology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - The Early Growth Genetics (EGG) and EArly Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortia

T2 - European Journal of Epidemiology

AU - EArly Genetics Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium

AU - Early Growth Genetics (EGG) Consortium

AU - Middeldorp, Christel M.

AU - Felix, Janine F.

AU - Mahajan, Anubha

AU - Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.

AU - Auvinen, Juha

AU - Bartels, Meike

AU - Bilbao, Jose Ramon

AU - Bisgaard, Hans

AU - Bønnelykke, Klaus

AU - Boomsma, Dorret I.

AU - Bradfield, Jonathan P.

AU - Bustamante, Mariona

AU - Chen, Zhanghua

AU - Curtin, John A.

AU - Custovic, Adnan

AU - Smith, George Davey

AU - Davies, Gareth E.

AU - Duijts, Liesbeth

AU - Eastwood, Peter R.

AU - Eliasen, Anders U.

AU - Estivill, Xavier

AU - Evans, David M.

AU - Fedko, Iryna O.

AU - Gauderman, W. James

AU - Gilliland, Frank

AU - Granell, Raquel

AU - Grant, Struan F.A.

AU - Guxens, Monica

AU - Hakonarson, Hakon

AU - Hartman, Catharina A.

AU - Heinrich, Joachim

AU - Henders, Anjali K.

AU - Henderson, John

AU - Holt, Patrick

AU - Hottenga, Jouke Jan

AU - Iñíguez, Carmen

AU - Hypponen, Elina

AU - Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.

AU - Järvelin, Marjo Riitta

AU - Jugessur, Astanand

AU - Kähönen, Mika

AU - Kaprio, Jaakko

AU - Karhunen, Ville

AU - Kemp, John P.

AU - Koppelman, Gerard H.

AU - Kumar, Ashish

AU - Lahti, Jari

AU - Larsson, Henrik

AU - Lawlor, Debbie A.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

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KW - Childhood traits and disorders

KW - Consortium

KW - Genetics

KW - Longitudinal

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