Ten years of publicly funded biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Australia

Ashley M. Hopkins, Susanna M. Proudman, Agnes Vitry, Michael J. Sorich, Leslie G. Cleland, Michael D. Wiese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment were among the first high-cost medicines to be subsidised in Australia. • High-cost medicines pose several challenges to the Australian National Medicines Policy, which aims to provide timely access to effective medicines at a cost individuals and the community can afford. Thus, novel restriction criteria were developed to encourage cost-effective use of bDMARDs. • Government expenditure on bDMARD subsidies for RA treatment grew to about $383 million in 2014. • Evidence that initiation and continuation criteria for bDMARDs meet usually applied cost-benefit criteria is lacking. • The combined expenditure on tocilizumab, certolizumab pegol and golimumab (added to the Australian Government's Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme in 2010) was $93 million in 2014, which is 210% over the initial estimate. • Present and future challenges with regard to bDMARDs for RA and other high-cost drugs include improved expenditure predictions, monitoring of cost-effectiveness in relation to actual use and strategic development, regulation and use of biosimilars. • Ten years of documentation on clinical and laboratory findings indicating eligibility to initiate and continue on bDMARDs remains un-used. These data represent an untapped opportunity to promote quality of use of bDMARDs and biosimilars and to improve cost predictions for high-cost drugs.

LanguageEnglish
Pages64-68.e1
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume204
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hopkins, Ashley M. ; Proudman, Susanna M. ; Vitry, Agnes ; Sorich, Michael J. ; Cleland, Leslie G. ; Wiese, Michael D. / Ten years of publicly funded biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Australia. In: Medical Journal of Australia. 2016 ; Vol. 204, No. 2. pp. 64-68.e1.
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Ten years of publicly funded biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Australia. / Hopkins, Ashley M.; Proudman, Susanna M.; Vitry, Agnes; Sorich, Michael J.; Cleland, Leslie G.; Wiese, Michael D.

In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 204, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 64-68.e1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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