Soft drink and sweet food consumption and suicidal behaviours among Chinese adolescents

Xiaoqun Pan, Cuilin Zhang, Zumin Shi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Greater soft drink consumption was associated with increased risk of mental health problems in Western countries. The objective of the study was to examine the association between soft drink and sweet food consumption and suicidal behaviours among adolescents in China. Methods: In 2005, a population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 100 schools in Jiangsu Province, China. Participants were aged 12-19 years old (n = 23 976). Results: Among the participants, 20.5% reported daily soft drink consumption; 18.6% reported having suicidal ideation. Soft drink consumption was significantly and positively associated with risk of suicidal plan or suicide attempt. Prevalence of suicidal plan was12.8% among those who consumed soft drink at least three times per day and 6.2% among those who did not consume any soft drinks. In multivariate analyses, compared with soft drink consumption less than once per day, consumption at least three times per day was associated with 80% increased risk for suicidal plan and more than 3.5-fold increased risk for suicide attempt. Of note, nonconsumption of soft drinks was also associated with about 32% elevated risk for suicidal plan and suicidal attempt. High frequency intake of sweet food was associated with increased risk of suicidal behaviours. Conclusions: There is a positive association between consumption of soft drinks and sweet food and risks for suicidal behaviours among adolescents in China. Prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume100
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • China
  • Soft drink
  • Suicidal behaviour

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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