Sociodemographic correlates of smoking in pregnancy and antenatal-care attendance in Indigenous and non-Indigenous women in South Australia

C. Mittiga, K. Ettridge, K. Martin, G. Tucker, R. Dubyna, B. Catcheside, W. Scheil, L. Maksimovic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Smoking in pregnancy is a key health issue in Australia, particularly among Indigenous women. However, few studies have examined the sociodemographic factors associated with smoking in pregnancy or the predictors of antenatal-care attendance among Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian women who smoke. Data from the South Australian perinatal statistics collection of all births from 2000-2010 (n≤197538) were analysed separately by Indigenous status to determine the sociodemographic factors associated with smoking in pregnancy and antenatal-care attendance by women who smoke. For Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, smoking in pregnancy was significantly independently associated with socioeconomic disadvantage, residing in regional or remote areas, increased parity, unemployment, being a public patient and attending fewer antenatal care visits. Smoking in pregnancy was associated with younger age and not being partnered only for non-Indigenous women. For Indigenous and non-Indigenous pregnant women who smoked, antenatal-care attendance was lower among women who were of younger age, higher parity, unemployed and not partnered. Differences in attendance within sociodemographic factors were greater for Indigenous women. Therefore, while sociodemographic correlates of smoking in pregnancy and antenatal-care attendance are largely similar for Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, tailored cessation and antenatal-care programs that reflect the differences in sociodemographic groups most at risk may be beneficial.

LanguageEnglish
Pages452-460
Number of pages9
JournalAustralian Journal of Primary Health
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Sociodemographic correlates of smoking in pregnancy and antenatal-care attendance in Indigenous and non-Indigenous women in South Australia",
abstract = "Smoking in pregnancy is a key health issue in Australia, particularly among Indigenous women. However, few studies have examined the sociodemographic factors associated with smoking in pregnancy or the predictors of antenatal-care attendance among Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian women who smoke. Data from the South Australian perinatal statistics collection of all births from 2000-2010 (n≤197538) were analysed separately by Indigenous status to determine the sociodemographic factors associated with smoking in pregnancy and antenatal-care attendance by women who smoke. For Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, smoking in pregnancy was significantly independently associated with socioeconomic disadvantage, residing in regional or remote areas, increased parity, unemployment, being a public patient and attending fewer antenatal care visits. Smoking in pregnancy was associated with younger age and not being partnered only for non-Indigenous women. For Indigenous and non-Indigenous pregnant women who smoked, antenatal-care attendance was lower among women who were of younger age, higher parity, unemployed and not partnered. Differences in attendance within sociodemographic factors were greater for Indigenous women. Therefore, while sociodemographic correlates of smoking in pregnancy and antenatal-care attendance are largely similar for Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, tailored cessation and antenatal-care programs that reflect the differences in sociodemographic groups most at risk may be beneficial.",
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Sociodemographic correlates of smoking in pregnancy and antenatal-care attendance in Indigenous and non-Indigenous women in South Australia. / Mittiga, C.; Ettridge, K.; Martin, K.; Tucker, G.; Dubyna, R.; Catcheside, B.; Scheil, W.; Maksimovic, L.

In: Australian Journal of Primary Health, Vol. 22, No. 5, 01.01.2016, p. 452-460.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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