Short-term endotracheal climate changes and clinical effects of a heat and moisture exchanger with an integrated electrostatic virus and bacterial filter developed for laryngectomized individuals

Renske J. Scheenstra, Sara H. Muller, Andrew Vincent, Annemieke H. Ackerstaff, Irene Jacobi, Frans J.M. Hilgers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conclusion: Both the regularly used heat and moisture exchanger (R-HME) and the HME with both an antimicrobial and hygroscopic element (F-HME) are effective moisture exchangers. The antimicrobial filter of the F-HME acts as a heat exchanger. The external features of the F-HME were experienced as inconvenient, but decreased sputum production was reported as well. Objectives: Recently an HME with an integrated antimicrobial filter has become available for use in laryngectomized patients. The purpose of this study was to assess its short-term endotracheal climate changes and feasibility in daily practice. Methods: Endotracheal temperature and humidity were successfully measured in 13 laryngectomized patients (2652 analysed full breaths), during 10 min rest-breathing with the R-HME, with an F-HME and without HME in a randomized sequence. Additionally, a 3 week prospective clinical feasibility trial was conducted in 17 laryngectomized patients. Results: Both R-HME and F-HME increase endotracheal minimum humidity values (5.8 and 4.7 mgH2O/L, respectively; p <0.0001). Compared with open stoma breathing, in contrast to the R-HME, the F-HME increases both end-inspiratory and end-expiratory temperature values (1.1°C, and 0.6°C, respectively). After the 3-week clinical feasibility trial, one patient dropped out; 11 patients (11/16=69%) disliked the larger design of the F-HME and all patients reported less optimal airtight occlusion. Five patients (5/16=31%) reported remarkably decreased sputum production.

LanguageEnglish
Pages739-746
Number of pages8
JournalActa Oto-Laryngologica
Volume130
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Filtration
  • Heat and moisture exchanger
  • Heat capacity
  • Patient compliance
  • Short-term clinical effects
  • Temperature and humidity
  • Total laryngectomy
  • Tracheal climate
  • Virus and bacterial filter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

@article{3df5824f1b2f45d7b14447185472a702,
title = "Short-term endotracheal climate changes and clinical effects of a heat and moisture exchanger with an integrated electrostatic virus and bacterial filter developed for laryngectomized individuals",
abstract = "Conclusion: Both the regularly used heat and moisture exchanger (R-HME) and the HME with both an antimicrobial and hygroscopic element (F-HME) are effective moisture exchangers. The antimicrobial filter of the F-HME acts as a heat exchanger. The external features of the F-HME were experienced as inconvenient, but decreased sputum production was reported as well. Objectives: Recently an HME with an integrated antimicrobial filter has become available for use in laryngectomized patients. The purpose of this study was to assess its short-term endotracheal climate changes and feasibility in daily practice. Methods: Endotracheal temperature and humidity were successfully measured in 13 laryngectomized patients (2652 analysed full breaths), during 10 min rest-breathing with the R-HME, with an F-HME and without HME in a randomized sequence. Additionally, a 3 week prospective clinical feasibility trial was conducted in 17 laryngectomized patients. Results: Both R-HME and F-HME increase endotracheal minimum humidity values (5.8 and 4.7 mgH2O/L, respectively; p <0.0001). Compared with open stoma breathing, in contrast to the R-HME, the F-HME increases both end-inspiratory and end-expiratory temperature values (1.1°C, and 0.6°C, respectively). After the 3-week clinical feasibility trial, one patient dropped out; 11 patients (11/16=69{\%}) disliked the larger design of the F-HME and all patients reported less optimal airtight occlusion. Five patients (5/16=31{\%}) reported remarkably decreased sputum production.",
keywords = "Filtration, Heat and moisture exchanger, Heat capacity, Patient compliance, Short-term clinical effects, Temperature and humidity, Total laryngectomy, Tracheal climate, Virus and bacterial filter",
author = "Scheenstra, {Renske J.} and Muller, {Sara H.} and Andrew Vincent and Ackerstaff, {Annemieke H.} and Irene Jacobi and Hilgers, {Frans J.M.}",
year = "2010",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3109/00016480903382790",
language = "English",
volume = "130",
pages = "739--746",
journal = "Acta Oto-Laryngologica",
issn = "0001-6489",
number = "6",

}

Short-term endotracheal climate changes and clinical effects of a heat and moisture exchanger with an integrated electrostatic virus and bacterial filter developed for laryngectomized individuals. / Scheenstra, Renske J.; Muller, Sara H.; Vincent, Andrew; Ackerstaff, Annemieke H.; Jacobi, Irene; Hilgers, Frans J.M.

In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, Vol. 130, No. 6, 01.06.2010, p. 739-746.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Short-term endotracheal climate changes and clinical effects of a heat and moisture exchanger with an integrated electrostatic virus and bacterial filter developed for laryngectomized individuals

AU - Scheenstra, Renske J.

AU - Muller, Sara H.

AU - Vincent, Andrew

AU - Ackerstaff, Annemieke H.

AU - Jacobi, Irene

AU - Hilgers, Frans J.M.

PY - 2010/6/1

Y1 - 2010/6/1

N2 - Conclusion: Both the regularly used heat and moisture exchanger (R-HME) and the HME with both an antimicrobial and hygroscopic element (F-HME) are effective moisture exchangers. The antimicrobial filter of the F-HME acts as a heat exchanger. The external features of the F-HME were experienced as inconvenient, but decreased sputum production was reported as well. Objectives: Recently an HME with an integrated antimicrobial filter has become available for use in laryngectomized patients. The purpose of this study was to assess its short-term endotracheal climate changes and feasibility in daily practice. Methods: Endotracheal temperature and humidity were successfully measured in 13 laryngectomized patients (2652 analysed full breaths), during 10 min rest-breathing with the R-HME, with an F-HME and without HME in a randomized sequence. Additionally, a 3 week prospective clinical feasibility trial was conducted in 17 laryngectomized patients. Results: Both R-HME and F-HME increase endotracheal minimum humidity values (5.8 and 4.7 mgH2O/L, respectively; p <0.0001). Compared with open stoma breathing, in contrast to the R-HME, the F-HME increases both end-inspiratory and end-expiratory temperature values (1.1°C, and 0.6°C, respectively). After the 3-week clinical feasibility trial, one patient dropped out; 11 patients (11/16=69%) disliked the larger design of the F-HME and all patients reported less optimal airtight occlusion. Five patients (5/16=31%) reported remarkably decreased sputum production.

AB - Conclusion: Both the regularly used heat and moisture exchanger (R-HME) and the HME with both an antimicrobial and hygroscopic element (F-HME) are effective moisture exchangers. The antimicrobial filter of the F-HME acts as a heat exchanger. The external features of the F-HME were experienced as inconvenient, but decreased sputum production was reported as well. Objectives: Recently an HME with an integrated antimicrobial filter has become available for use in laryngectomized patients. The purpose of this study was to assess its short-term endotracheal climate changes and feasibility in daily practice. Methods: Endotracheal temperature and humidity were successfully measured in 13 laryngectomized patients (2652 analysed full breaths), during 10 min rest-breathing with the R-HME, with an F-HME and without HME in a randomized sequence. Additionally, a 3 week prospective clinical feasibility trial was conducted in 17 laryngectomized patients. Results: Both R-HME and F-HME increase endotracheal minimum humidity values (5.8 and 4.7 mgH2O/L, respectively; p <0.0001). Compared with open stoma breathing, in contrast to the R-HME, the F-HME increases both end-inspiratory and end-expiratory temperature values (1.1°C, and 0.6°C, respectively). After the 3-week clinical feasibility trial, one patient dropped out; 11 patients (11/16=69%) disliked the larger design of the F-HME and all patients reported less optimal airtight occlusion. Five patients (5/16=31%) reported remarkably decreased sputum production.

KW - Filtration

KW - Heat and moisture exchanger

KW - Heat capacity

KW - Patient compliance

KW - Short-term clinical effects

KW - Temperature and humidity

KW - Total laryngectomy

KW - Tracheal climate

KW - Virus and bacterial filter

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77952252758&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/00016480903382790

DO - 10.3109/00016480903382790

M3 - Article

VL - 130

SP - 739

EP - 746

JO - Acta Oto-Laryngologica

T2 - Acta Oto-Laryngologica

JF - Acta Oto-Laryngologica

SN - 0001-6489

IS - 6

ER -