Self-rated oral health and oral health-related factors: The role of social inequality

Gloria Mejia Delgado, J. M. Armfield, L. M. Jamieson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The reasons why social inequality is associated with oral health outcomes is poorly understood. This study investigated whether stratification by different measures of socio-economic status (SES) helped elucidate these associations. Methods: Cross-sectional survey data were used from Australia's 2004-06 National Survey of Adult Oral Health. The outcome variable was poor self-rated oral health. Explanatory variables comprised five domains: demographic, economic, general health behaviour, oral health-related quality of life and perceived need for dental care. These explanatory variables were each stratified by three measures of SES: education, income and occupation. Results: The overall proportion of adults reporting fair or poor oral health was 17.0% (95% CI 16.1, 18.0). Of these, a higher proportion were older, Indigenous, non-Australian born, poorly educated, annual income <$20 000, unemployed, eligible for public dental care, smoked tobacco, avoided food in the last 12 months, experienced discomfort with their dental appearance, experienced toothache or reported a need for dental care. In stratified analyses, a greater number of differences persisted in the oral health impairment and perceived need for dental care domains. Conclusions: Irrespective of the SES measure used, more associations between self-rated oral health and dental-specific factors were observed than associations between self-rated oral health and general factors.

LanguageEnglish
Pages226-233
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian Dental Journal
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Self-rated oral health
  • demographic
  • economic
  • oral health impairment
  • perceived need for dental care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

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Self-rated oral health and oral health-related factors : The role of social inequality. / Mejia Delgado, Gloria; Armfield, J. M.; Jamieson, L. M.

In: Australian Dental Journal, Vol. 59, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 226-233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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