Practical challenges of conducting research into rheumatic fever in remote Aboriginal communities

Malcolm I. McDonald, Norma Benger, Alex Brown, Bart J. Currie, Jonathan R. Carapetis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• Before embarking on an epidemiological study of acute rheumatic fever in remote Aboriginal communities, researchers engaged in the processes of community consultation, consent and household enrolment. • Community expectations and time constraints are not necessarily those of the funding bodies, and a considerable investment of time and local engagement was required before the project proceeded with local support. • The remoteness of the communities, harsh climate and limited infrastructure made working conditions difficult. Nevertheless, the study was completed and the results are being returned to the local councils and households. The research team continues to maintain its relationship with each study community.

LanguageEnglish
Pages511-513
Number of pages3
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume184
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

McDonald, M. I., Benger, N., Brown, A., Currie, B. J., & Carapetis, J. R. (2006). Practical challenges of conducting research into rheumatic fever in remote Aboriginal communities. Medical Journal of Australia, 184(10), 511-513.
McDonald, Malcolm I. ; Benger, Norma ; Brown, Alex ; Currie, Bart J. ; Carapetis, Jonathan R. / Practical challenges of conducting research into rheumatic fever in remote Aboriginal communities. In: Medical Journal of Australia. 2006 ; Vol. 184, No. 10. pp. 511-513.
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McDonald, MI, Benger, N, Brown, A, Currie, BJ & Carapetis, JR 2006, 'Practical challenges of conducting research into rheumatic fever in remote Aboriginal communities', Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 184, no. 10, pp. 511-513.

Practical challenges of conducting research into rheumatic fever in remote Aboriginal communities. / McDonald, Malcolm I.; Benger, Norma; Brown, Alex; Currie, Bart J.; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 184, No. 10, 15.05.2006, p. 511-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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