Policy, research and residents’ perspectives on built environments implicated in heart disease: A concept mapping approach

Ivana Stankov, Natasha J. Howard, Mark Daniel, Margaret Cargo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An underrepresentation of stakeholder perspectives within urban health research arguably limits our understanding of what is a multi-dimensional and complex relationship between the built environment and health. By engaging a wide range of stakeholders using a participatory concept mapping approach, this study aimed to achieve a more holistic and nuanced understanding of the built environments shaping disease risk, specifically cardiometabolic risk (CMR). Moreover, this study aimed to ascertain the importance and changeability of identified environments through government action. Through the concept mapping process, community members, researchers, government and non-government stakeholders collectively identified eleven clusters encompassing 102 built environmental domains related to CMR, a number of which are underrepresented within the literature. Among the identified built environments, open space, public transportation and pedestrian environments were highlighted as key targets for policy intervention. Whilst there was substantive convergence in stakeholder groups’ perspectives concerning the built environment and CMR, there were disparities in the level of importance government stakeholders and community members respectively assigned to pedestrian environments and street connectivity. These findings support the role of participatory methods in strengthening how urban health issues are understood and in affording novel insights into points of action for public health and policy intervention.

LanguageEnglish
Article number170
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Feb 2017

Keywords

  • Built environment
  • Cardiometabolic risk
  • Community participation
  • Concept mapping
  • Policy
  • Researcher perspectives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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