Patient and carer perceptions of cancer care in South Australia

Kerri R. Beckmann, Ian N. Olver, Graeme P. Young, David M. Roder, Linda M. Foreman, Brenda Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Quality of care from the patient's perspective is an increasingly important outcome measure for cancer services. Patients' and carers' perceptions of cancer care were assessed through structured telephone interviews, 4-10 months post-discharge, which focused on experiences during the most recent hospital admission. A total of 481 patients with a primary diagnosis of cancer (ICD-10 C codes) were recruited, along with 345 carers nominated by the patients. Perceptions of clinical care were generally positive. Less positive aspects of care included not being asked how they were coping, not being offered counselling, and not receiving written information about procedures. Results also highlighted inadequate discharge processes. Carers were more likely than patients to report negative experiences. Perceptions of care also differed by cancer type.

LanguageEnglish
Pages645-655
Number of pages11
JournalAustralian Health Review
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2009
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Beckmann, K. R., Olver, I. N., Young, G. P., Roder, D. M., Foreman, L. M., & Wilson, B. (2009). Patient and carer perceptions of cancer care in South Australia. Australian Health Review, 33(4), 645-655. https://doi.org/10.1071/AH090645
Beckmann, Kerri R. ; Olver, Ian N. ; Young, Graeme P. ; Roder, David M. ; Foreman, Linda M. ; Wilson, Brenda. / Patient and carer perceptions of cancer care in South Australia. In: Australian Health Review. 2009 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 645-655.
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Beckmann, KR, Olver, IN, Young, GP, Roder, DM, Foreman, LM & Wilson, B 2009, 'Patient and carer perceptions of cancer care in South Australia', Australian Health Review, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 645-655. https://doi.org/10.1071/AH090645

Patient and carer perceptions of cancer care in South Australia. / Beckmann, Kerri R.; Olver, Ian N.; Young, Graeme P.; Roder, David M.; Foreman, Linda M.; Wilson, Brenda.

In: Australian Health Review, Vol. 33, No. 4, 01.11.2009, p. 645-655.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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