Palmolein and olive oil consumed within a high protein test meal have similar effects on postprandial endothelial function in overweight and obese men: A randomized controlled trial

Welma Stonehouse, Grant D. Brinkworth, Manny Noakes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study assessed the postprandial effects of high fat, high protein meals containing either palmolein or olive oil on endothelial function in overweight/obese men. Design: 28 men (32-65yr; 25-35kg/m2) consumed, in random order 1wk apart, isocaloric high protein, high fat meals (2791kJ, 40g protein (~3g l-arginine), 44g fat, 21g carbohydrate) prepared with either 40g palmolein or 40g olive oil after an overnight fast. The SFA:MUFA:PUFA ratio of the oils were: palmolein, 42:47:12; olive oil, 17:76:7. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), circulating endothelial function markers, nitrotyrosine (oxidative stress marker), triglycerides, glucose and insulin were assessed pre-meal and hourly for 5h. Mixed model procedures were used to analyze the data. Results: Meal consumption increased serum triglycerides (time effect, P<0.001); with no meal differences (meal×time interaction, P=0.93). Serum insulin peaked 1h post-consumption and returned to pre-meal concentrations by 5h with both meals (time effect, P<0.001; meal×time effect, P=0.68). FMD, serum intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin did not change (meal×time effect, P>0.4). Olive oil transiently increased plasma nitrotyrosine after 1h compared to palmolein (meal×time interaction, P=0.002) whereas both meals increased serum vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) after 1h (time effect, P<0.001; meal×time interaction, P=0.98). Both nitrotyrosine and VCAM-1 returned to pre-meal concentrations after 2h. Conclusion: In the context of a high protein meal, palmolein similarly to olive oil did not affect postprandial endothelial function in overweight/obese men. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) (http://www.anzctr.org.au/default.aspx). Trial ID: ACTRN12613000136707.

LanguageEnglish
Pages178-185
Number of pages8
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume239
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2015

Keywords

  • Endothelial function
  • Flow-mediated dilation
  • L-arginine
  • Olive oil
  • Palmolein
  • Postprandial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Palmolein and olive oil consumed within a high protein test meal have similar effects on postprandial endothelial function in overweight and obese men: A randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Objective: This study assessed the postprandial effects of high fat, high protein meals containing either palmolein or olive oil on endothelial function in overweight/obese men. Design: 28 men (32-65yr; 25-35kg/m2) consumed, in random order 1wk apart, isocaloric high protein, high fat meals (2791kJ, 40g protein (~3g l-arginine), 44g fat, 21g carbohydrate) prepared with either 40g palmolein or 40g olive oil after an overnight fast. The SFA:MUFA:PUFA ratio of the oils were: palmolein, 42:47:12; olive oil, 17:76:7. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), circulating endothelial function markers, nitrotyrosine (oxidative stress marker), triglycerides, glucose and insulin were assessed pre-meal and hourly for 5h. Mixed model procedures were used to analyze the data. Results: Meal consumption increased serum triglycerides (time effect, P<0.001); with no meal differences (meal×time interaction, P=0.93). Serum insulin peaked 1h post-consumption and returned to pre-meal concentrations by 5h with both meals (time effect, P<0.001; meal×time effect, P=0.68). FMD, serum intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin did not change (meal×time effect, P>0.4). Olive oil transiently increased plasma nitrotyrosine after 1h compared to palmolein (meal×time interaction, P=0.002) whereas both meals increased serum vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) after 1h (time effect, P<0.001; meal×time interaction, P=0.98). Both nitrotyrosine and VCAM-1 returned to pre-meal concentrations after 2h. Conclusion: In the context of a high protein meal, palmolein similarly to olive oil did not affect postprandial endothelial function in overweight/obese men. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) (http://www.anzctr.org.au/default.aspx). Trial ID: ACTRN12613000136707.",
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Palmolein and olive oil consumed within a high protein test meal have similar effects on postprandial endothelial function in overweight and obese men : A randomized controlled trial. / Stonehouse, Welma; Brinkworth, Grant D.; Noakes, Manny.

In: Atherosclerosis, Vol. 239, No. 1, 01.03.2015, p. 178-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Palmolein and olive oil consumed within a high protein test meal have similar effects on postprandial endothelial function in overweight and obese men

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AU - Brinkworth, Grant D.

AU - Noakes, Manny

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N2 - Objective: This study assessed the postprandial effects of high fat, high protein meals containing either palmolein or olive oil on endothelial function in overweight/obese men. Design: 28 men (32-65yr; 25-35kg/m2) consumed, in random order 1wk apart, isocaloric high protein, high fat meals (2791kJ, 40g protein (~3g l-arginine), 44g fat, 21g carbohydrate) prepared with either 40g palmolein or 40g olive oil after an overnight fast. The SFA:MUFA:PUFA ratio of the oils were: palmolein, 42:47:12; olive oil, 17:76:7. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), circulating endothelial function markers, nitrotyrosine (oxidative stress marker), triglycerides, glucose and insulin were assessed pre-meal and hourly for 5h. Mixed model procedures were used to analyze the data. Results: Meal consumption increased serum triglycerides (time effect, P<0.001); with no meal differences (meal×time interaction, P=0.93). Serum insulin peaked 1h post-consumption and returned to pre-meal concentrations by 5h with both meals (time effect, P<0.001; meal×time effect, P=0.68). FMD, serum intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin did not change (meal×time effect, P>0.4). Olive oil transiently increased plasma nitrotyrosine after 1h compared to palmolein (meal×time interaction, P=0.002) whereas both meals increased serum vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) after 1h (time effect, P<0.001; meal×time interaction, P=0.98). Both nitrotyrosine and VCAM-1 returned to pre-meal concentrations after 2h. Conclusion: In the context of a high protein meal, palmolein similarly to olive oil did not affect postprandial endothelial function in overweight/obese men. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) (http://www.anzctr.org.au/default.aspx). Trial ID: ACTRN12613000136707.

AB - Objective: This study assessed the postprandial effects of high fat, high protein meals containing either palmolein or olive oil on endothelial function in overweight/obese men. Design: 28 men (32-65yr; 25-35kg/m2) consumed, in random order 1wk apart, isocaloric high protein, high fat meals (2791kJ, 40g protein (~3g l-arginine), 44g fat, 21g carbohydrate) prepared with either 40g palmolein or 40g olive oil after an overnight fast. The SFA:MUFA:PUFA ratio of the oils were: palmolein, 42:47:12; olive oil, 17:76:7. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), circulating endothelial function markers, nitrotyrosine (oxidative stress marker), triglycerides, glucose and insulin were assessed pre-meal and hourly for 5h. Mixed model procedures were used to analyze the data. Results: Meal consumption increased serum triglycerides (time effect, P<0.001); with no meal differences (meal×time interaction, P=0.93). Serum insulin peaked 1h post-consumption and returned to pre-meal concentrations by 5h with both meals (time effect, P<0.001; meal×time effect, P=0.68). FMD, serum intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin did not change (meal×time effect, P>0.4). Olive oil transiently increased plasma nitrotyrosine after 1h compared to palmolein (meal×time interaction, P=0.002) whereas both meals increased serum vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) after 1h (time effect, P<0.001; meal×time interaction, P=0.98). Both nitrotyrosine and VCAM-1 returned to pre-meal concentrations after 2h. Conclusion: In the context of a high protein meal, palmolein similarly to olive oil did not affect postprandial endothelial function in overweight/obese men. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) (http://www.anzctr.org.au/default.aspx). Trial ID: ACTRN12613000136707.

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