Objectively measured light-intensity physical activity is independently associated with 2-h plasma glucose

Genevieve N. Healy, David W. Dunstan, Jo Salmon, Ester Cerin, Jonathan E. Shaw, Paul Z. Zimmet, Neville Owen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE - We examined the associations of objectively measured sedentary time, light-intensity physical activity, and moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity with fasting and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose in Australian adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A total of 67 men and 106 women (mean age ± SD 53.3 ± 11.9 years) without diagnosed diabetes were recruited from the 2004-2005 Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study. Physical activity was measured by Actigraph accelerometers worn during waking hours for 7 consecutive days and summarized as sedentary time (accelerometer counts/min <100; average hours/day), light-intensity (counts/min 100-1951), and moderate- to vigorous-intensity (counts/min ≥1,952). An oral glucose tolerance test was used to ascertain 2-h plasma glucose and fasting plasma glucose. RESULTS - After adjustment for confounders (including waist circumference), sedentary time was positively associated with 2-h plasma glucose (b = 0.29, 95% CI 0.11-0.48, P = 0.002); light-intensity activity time (b = -0.25, -0.45 to -0.06, P = 0.012) and moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity time (b = -1.07, -1.77 to -0.37, P = 0.003) were negatively associated. Light-intensity activity remained significantly associated with 2-h plasma glucose following further adjustment for moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity (b = -0.22, -0.42 to -0.03, P = 0.023). Associations of all activity measures with fasting plasma glucose were nonsignificant (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS - These data provide the first objective evidence that light-intensity physical activity is beneficially associated with blood glucose and that sedentary time is unfavorably associated with blood glucose. These objective data support previous findings from studies using self-report measures, and suggest that substituting light-intensity activity for television viewing or other sedentary time may be a practical and achievable preventive strategy to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1384-1389
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

Cite this

Healy, G. N., Dunstan, D. W., Salmon, J., Cerin, E., Shaw, J. E., Zimmet, P. Z., & Owen, N. (2007). Objectively measured light-intensity physical activity is independently associated with 2-h plasma glucose. Diabetes Care, 30(6), 1384-1389. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc07-0114
Healy, Genevieve N. ; Dunstan, David W. ; Salmon, Jo ; Cerin, Ester ; Shaw, Jonathan E. ; Zimmet, Paul Z. ; Owen, Neville. / Objectively measured light-intensity physical activity is independently associated with 2-h plasma glucose. In: Diabetes Care. 2007 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. 1384-1389.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE - We examined the associations of objectively measured sedentary time, light-intensity physical activity, and moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity with fasting and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose in Australian adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A total of 67 men and 106 women (mean age ± SD 53.3 ± 11.9 years) without diagnosed diabetes were recruited from the 2004-2005 Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study. Physical activity was measured by Actigraph accelerometers worn during waking hours for 7 consecutive days and summarized as sedentary time (accelerometer counts/min <100; average hours/day), light-intensity (counts/min 100-1951), and moderate- to vigorous-intensity (counts/min ≥1,952). An oral glucose tolerance test was used to ascertain 2-h plasma glucose and fasting plasma glucose. RESULTS - After adjustment for confounders (including waist circumference), sedentary time was positively associated with 2-h plasma glucose (b = 0.29, 95{\%} CI 0.11-0.48, P = 0.002); light-intensity activity time (b = -0.25, -0.45 to -0.06, P = 0.012) and moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity time (b = -1.07, -1.77 to -0.37, P = 0.003) were negatively associated. Light-intensity activity remained significantly associated with 2-h plasma glucose following further adjustment for moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity (b = -0.22, -0.42 to -0.03, P = 0.023). Associations of all activity measures with fasting plasma glucose were nonsignificant (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS - These data provide the first objective evidence that light-intensity physical activity is beneficially associated with blood glucose and that sedentary time is unfavorably associated with blood glucose. These objective data support previous findings from studies using self-report measures, and suggest that substituting light-intensity activity for television viewing or other sedentary time may be a practical and achievable preventive strategy to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.",
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Healy, GN, Dunstan, DW, Salmon, J, Cerin, E, Shaw, JE, Zimmet, PZ & Owen, N 2007, 'Objectively measured light-intensity physical activity is independently associated with 2-h plasma glucose', Diabetes Care, vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 1384-1389. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc07-0114

Objectively measured light-intensity physical activity is independently associated with 2-h plasma glucose. / Healy, Genevieve N.; Dunstan, David W.; Salmon, Jo; Cerin, Ester; Shaw, Jonathan E.; Zimmet, Paul Z.; Owen, Neville.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 30, No. 6, 01.05.2007, p. 1384-1389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Objectively measured light-intensity physical activity is independently associated with 2-h plasma glucose

AU - Healy, Genevieve N.

AU - Dunstan, David W.

AU - Salmon, Jo

AU - Cerin, Ester

AU - Shaw, Jonathan E.

AU - Zimmet, Paul Z.

AU - Owen, Neville

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AB - OBJECTIVE - We examined the associations of objectively measured sedentary time, light-intensity physical activity, and moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity with fasting and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose in Australian adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A total of 67 men and 106 women (mean age ± SD 53.3 ± 11.9 years) without diagnosed diabetes were recruited from the 2004-2005 Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study. Physical activity was measured by Actigraph accelerometers worn during waking hours for 7 consecutive days and summarized as sedentary time (accelerometer counts/min <100; average hours/day), light-intensity (counts/min 100-1951), and moderate- to vigorous-intensity (counts/min ≥1,952). An oral glucose tolerance test was used to ascertain 2-h plasma glucose and fasting plasma glucose. RESULTS - After adjustment for confounders (including waist circumference), sedentary time was positively associated with 2-h plasma glucose (b = 0.29, 95% CI 0.11-0.48, P = 0.002); light-intensity activity time (b = -0.25, -0.45 to -0.06, P = 0.012) and moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity time (b = -1.07, -1.77 to -0.37, P = 0.003) were negatively associated. Light-intensity activity remained significantly associated with 2-h plasma glucose following further adjustment for moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity (b = -0.22, -0.42 to -0.03, P = 0.023). Associations of all activity measures with fasting plasma glucose were nonsignificant (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS - These data provide the first objective evidence that light-intensity physical activity is beneficially associated with blood glucose and that sedentary time is unfavorably associated with blood glucose. These objective data support previous findings from studies using self-report measures, and suggest that substituting light-intensity activity for television viewing or other sedentary time may be a practical and achievable preventive strategy to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

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