Monosodium glutamate is not associated with obesity or a greater prevalence of weight gain over 5 years: Findings from the Jiangsu Nutrition Study of Chinese adults

Zumin Shi, Natalie D. Luscombe-Marsh, Gary A. Wittert, Baojun Yuan, Yue Dai, Xiaoqun Pan, Anne W. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Animal studies and one large cross-sectional study of 752 healthy Chinese men and women suggest that monosodium glutamate (MSG) may be associated with overweight/obesity, and these findings raise public concern over the use of MSG as a flavour enhancer in many commercial foods. The aim of this analysis was to investigate a possible association between MSG intake and obesity, and determine whether a greater MSG intake is associated with a clinically significant weight gain over 5 years. Data from 1282 Chinese men and women who participated in the Jiangsu Nutrition Study were analysed. In the present study, MSG intake and body weight were quantitatively assessed in 2002 and followed up in 2007. MSG intake was not associated with significant weight gain after adjusting for age, sex, multiple lifestyle factors and energy intake. When total glutamate intake was added to the model, an inverse association between MSG intake and 5% weight gain was found (P=0028), but when the model was adjusted for either rice intake or food patterns, this association was abolished. These findings indicate that when other food items or dietary patterns are accounted for, no association exists between MSG intake and weight gain.

LanguageEnglish
Pages457-463
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume104
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2010

Keywords

  • Body weight gain
  • Dietary glutamate
  • Energy intake
  • Human studies
  • Longitudinal studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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abstract = "Animal studies and one large cross-sectional study of 752 healthy Chinese men and women suggest that monosodium glutamate (MSG) may be associated with overweight/obesity, and these findings raise public concern over the use of MSG as a flavour enhancer in many commercial foods. The aim of this analysis was to investigate a possible association between MSG intake and obesity, and determine whether a greater MSG intake is associated with a clinically significant weight gain over 5 years. Data from 1282 Chinese men and women who participated in the Jiangsu Nutrition Study were analysed. In the present study, MSG intake and body weight were quantitatively assessed in 2002 and followed up in 2007. MSG intake was not associated with significant weight gain after adjusting for age, sex, multiple lifestyle factors and energy intake. When total glutamate intake was added to the model, an inverse association between MSG intake and 5{\%} weight gain was found (P=0028), but when the model was adjusted for either rice intake or food patterns, this association was abolished. These findings indicate that when other food items or dietary patterns are accounted for, no association exists between MSG intake and weight gain.",
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Monosodium glutamate is not associated with obesity or a greater prevalence of weight gain over 5 years : Findings from the Jiangsu Nutrition Study of Chinese adults. / Shi, Zumin; Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D.; Wittert, Gary A.; Yuan, Baojun; Dai, Yue; Pan, Xiaoqun; Taylor, Anne W.

In: British Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 104, No. 3, 01.08.2010, p. 457-463.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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