Medical education: Revolution, devolution and evolution in curriculum philosophy and design

Gary A. Wittert, Adam J. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• Contemporary medical education must train skilled and compassionate health care professionals who are rigorous in their approach to patient care and their pursuit of knowledge and solutions. • Problem-based learning has been widely introduced, but there is no evidence that it leads to better outcomes than more traditional programs, and fundamental gaps in conceptual knowledge may result. • Recently, emphasis has been placed on a solid grounding in underlying concepts combined with a systems-based approach, and ability to transfer information and solve problems. • Integrating traditional scientific and clinical disciplines with progressive and continuous assessment, may be a better means of achieving the combined aims of clinically relevant curriculum design, vertical integration of medical knowledge, and facilitation of the continuum of training. • Being adaptable and flexible, cognisant of costs, and driven by evidence are key features of delivering medical education and contemporary medical practice. • Educational research should lead to continuous improvement, but innovation without evaluation and attention to costs may create as many, or more, problems as are solved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-37
Number of pages3
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume191
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished or Issued - 6 Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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