Matching for Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) in corneal transplantation - To do or not to do

T. H. van Essen, D. L. Roelen, Keryn Williams, M. J. Jager

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As many patients with severe corneal disease are not even considered as candidates for a human graft due to their high risk of rejection, it is essential to find ways to reduce the chance of rejection. One of the options is proper matching of the cornea donor and recipient for the Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA), a subject of much debate. Currently, patients receiving their first corneal allograft are hardly ever matched for HLA and even patients undergoing a regraft usually do not receive an HLA-matched graft. While anterior and posterior lamellar grafts are not immune to rejection, they are usually performed in low risk, non-vascularized cases. These are the cases in which the immune privilege due to the avascular status and active immune inhibition is still intact. Once broken due to infection, sensitization or trauma, rejection will occur. There is enough data to show that when proper DNA-based typing techniques are being used, even low risk perforating corneal transplantations benefit from matching for HLA Class I, and high risk cases from HLA Class I and probably Class II matching. Combining HLA class I and class II matching, or using the HLAMatchmaker could further improve the effect of HLA matching. However, new techniques could be applied to reduce the chance of rejection. Options are the local or systemic use of biologics, or gene therapy, aiming at preventing or suppressing immune responses. The goal of all these approaches should be to prevent a first rejection, as secondary grafts are usually at higher risk of complications including rejections than first grafts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-110
Number of pages27
JournalProgress in Retinal and Eye Research
Volume46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cornea
  • Human Leukocyte Antigen
  • Matching
  • Survival
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this