Lost opportunities with Australia's health workforce?

Matthew J. Leach, Leonie Segal, Esther May

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    13 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    • Concerns have been raised about the capacity of the health workforce to meet increasing future health care demands. • Strategies aimed at improving workforce supply, at least in Australia, are focused heavily on education (ie, increasing the number of training places in key health professions) and recruitment (ie, recruiting overseas-trained health care professionals). • Data from the 2006 Australian Bureau of Statistics census of population and housing indicate that while many Australians hold health professional qualifications, many are either not in the workforce or not employed within the health occupation they hold qualifications for. • Some immediate solutions for increasing the health workforce are to attract qualified health professionals who are either not in the workforce or are working outside the health occupation back into their occupational role; to increase worker retention for those still working within the occupations they trained for; and to explore strategies for better retention of new graduates.

    LanguageEnglish
    Pages167-172
    Number of pages6
    JournalMedical Journal of Australia
    Volume193
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2 Aug 2010

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Leach, Matthew J. ; Segal, Leonie ; May, Esther. / Lost opportunities with Australia's health workforce?. In: Medical Journal of Australia. 2010 ; Vol. 193, No. 3. pp. 167-172.
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    Lost opportunities with Australia's health workforce? / Leach, Matthew J.; Segal, Leonie; May, Esther.

    In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 193, No. 3, 02.08.2010, p. 167-172.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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