Kidney transplant graft outcomes in 379 257 recipients on 3 continents

Robert M. Merion, Nathan P. Goodrich, Rachel J. Johnson, Stephen McDonald, Graeme R. Russ, Brenda W. Gillespie, David Collett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Kidney transplant outcomes that vary by program or geopolitical unit may result from variability in practice patterns or health care delivery systems. In this collaborative study, we compared kidney graft outcomes among 4 countries (United States, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand) on 3 continents. We analyzed transplant and follow-up registry data from 1988-2014 for 379 257 recipients of first kidney-only transplants using Cox regression. Compared to the United States, 1-year adjusted graft failure risk was significantly higher in the United Kingdom (hazard ratio [HR] 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-1.26, P <.001) and New Zealand (hazard ratio [HR] 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-1.46, P <.001), but lower in Australia (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84-0.96, P =.001). In contrast, long-term adjusted graft failure risk (conditional on 1-year function) was significantly higher in the United States compared to Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom (HR 0.74, 0.75, and 0.74, respectively; each P <.001). Thus long-term kidney graft outcomes are approximately 25% worse in the United States than in 3 other countries with well-developed kidney transplant systems. Case mix differences and residual confounding from unmeasured factors were found to be unlikely explanations. These findings suggest that identification of potentially modifiable country-specific differences in care delivery and/or practice patterns should be sought.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1914-1923
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume18
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

Keywords

  • Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR)
  • clinical research/practice
  • graft survival
  • kidney disease
  • kidney transplantation/nephrology
  • rejection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Merion, R. M., Goodrich, N. P., Johnson, R. J., McDonald, S., Russ, G. R., Gillespie, B. W., & Collett, D. (2018). Kidney transplant graft outcomes in 379 257 recipients on 3 continents. American Journal of Transplantation, 18(8), 1914-1923. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.14694
Merion, Robert M. ; Goodrich, Nathan P. ; Johnson, Rachel J. ; McDonald, Stephen ; Russ, Graeme R. ; Gillespie, Brenda W. ; Collett, David. / Kidney transplant graft outcomes in 379 257 recipients on 3 continents. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2018 ; Vol. 18, No. 8. pp. 1914-1923.
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Merion, RM, Goodrich, NP, Johnson, RJ, McDonald, S, Russ, GR, Gillespie, BW & Collett, D 2018, 'Kidney transplant graft outcomes in 379 257 recipients on 3 continents', American Journal of Transplantation, vol. 18, no. 8, pp. 1914-1923. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.14694

Kidney transplant graft outcomes in 379 257 recipients on 3 continents. / Merion, Robert M.; Goodrich, Nathan P.; Johnson, Rachel J.; McDonald, Stephen; Russ, Graeme R.; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Collett, David.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 18, No. 8, 01.08.2018, p. 1914-1923.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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