Insulin levels in insulin resistance: Phantom of the metabolic opera?

Katherine Samaras, Aidan McElduff, Stephen M. Twigg, Joseph Proietto, John B. Prins, Timothy A. Welborn, Paul Zimmet, Donald J. Chisholm, Lesley V. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• Insulin resistance is considered a core component in the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome. • Some clinicians measure serum insulin concentrations in the mistaken belief that they can be used to diagnose insulin resistance. • Serum insulin levels are poor measures of insulin resistance. Furthermore, there is no clinical benefit in measuring insulin resistance in clinical practice. • Measurements of fasting serum insulin levels should be reserved for large population-based epidemiological studies, where they can provide valuable data on the relationship of insulin sensitivity to risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. • Clinicians should shift from identifying "insulin resistance" to identifying riskfactors, such as fasting glucose and lipid levels, hypertension and central obesity. These proven risk factors converge within the metabolic syndrome. • Individuals "at risk" of diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiac disease can be identified simply and inexpensively, using classic clinical techniques, such as history-taking, physical examination, and very basic investigations.

LanguageEnglish
Pages159-161
Number of pages3
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume185
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 7 Aug 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Samaras, K., McElduff, A., Twigg, S. M., Proietto, J., Prins, J. B., Welborn, T. A., ... Campbell, L. V. (2006). Insulin levels in insulin resistance: Phantom of the metabolic opera? Medical Journal of Australia, 185(3), 159-161.
Samaras, Katherine ; McElduff, Aidan ; Twigg, Stephen M. ; Proietto, Joseph ; Prins, John B. ; Welborn, Timothy A. ; Zimmet, Paul ; Chisholm, Donald J. ; Campbell, Lesley V. / Insulin levels in insulin resistance : Phantom of the metabolic opera?. In: Medical Journal of Australia. 2006 ; Vol. 185, No. 3. pp. 159-161.
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Samaras, K, McElduff, A, Twigg, SM, Proietto, J, Prins, JB, Welborn, TA, Zimmet, P, Chisholm, DJ & Campbell, LV 2006, 'Insulin levels in insulin resistance: Phantom of the metabolic opera?', Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 185, no. 3, pp. 159-161.

Insulin levels in insulin resistance : Phantom of the metabolic opera? / Samaras, Katherine; McElduff, Aidan; Twigg, Stephen M.; Proietto, Joseph; Prins, John B.; Welborn, Timothy A.; Zimmet, Paul; Chisholm, Donald J.; Campbell, Lesley V.

In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 185, No. 3, 07.08.2006, p. 159-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Samaras K, McElduff A, Twigg SM, Proietto J, Prins JB, Welborn TA et al. Insulin levels in insulin resistance: Phantom of the metabolic opera? Medical Journal of Australia. 2006 Aug 7;185(3):159-161.