Hospitalisations for pelvic inflammatory disease temporally related to a diagnosis of chlamydia or gonorrhoea: A retrospective cohort study

Joanne Reekie, Basil Donovan, Rebecca Guy, Jane S. Hocking, Louisa Jorm, John M. Kaldor, Donna B. Mak, David Preen, Sallie Pearson, Christine L. Roberts, Louise Stewart, Handan Wand, James Ward, Bette Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives: The presence and severity of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) symptoms are thought to vary by microbiological etiology but there is limited empirical evidence. We sought to estimate and compare the rates of hospitalisation for PID temporally related to diagnoses of gonorrhoea and chlamydia. Methods: All women, aged 15-45 years in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW), with a diagnosis of chlamydia or gonorrhoea between 01/07/2000 and 31/12/2008 were followed by record linkage for up to one year after their chlamydia or gonorrhoea diagnosis for hospitalisations for PID. Standardised incidence ratios compared the incidence of PID hospitalisations to the age-equivalent NSW population. Results: A total of 38,193 women had a chlamydia diagnosis, of which 483 were hospitalised for PID; incidence rate (IR) 13.9 per 1000 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) (95%CI 12.6-15.1). In contrast, 1015 had a gonorrhoea diagnosis, of which 45 were hospitalised for PID (IR 50.8 per 1000 PYFU, 95%CI 36.0-65.6). The annual incidence of PID hospitalisation temporally related to a chlamydia or gonorrhoea diagnosis was 27.0 (95%CI 24.4-29.8) and 96.6 (95%CI 64.7-138.8) times greater, respectively, than the age-equivalent NSW female population. Younger age, socio-economic disadvantage, having a diagnosis prior to 2005 and having a prior birth were also associated with being hospitalised for PID. Conclusions: Chlamydia and gonorrhoea are both associated with large increases in the risk of PID hospitalisation. Our data suggest the risk of PID hospitalisation is much higher for gonorrhoea than chlamydia; however, further research is needed to confirm this finding. Copyright:

LanguageEnglish
Article numbere94361
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Apr 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Reekie, Joanne ; Donovan, Basil ; Guy, Rebecca ; Hocking, Jane S. ; Jorm, Louisa ; Kaldor, John M. ; Mak, Donna B. ; Preen, David ; Pearson, Sallie ; Roberts, Christine L. ; Stewart, Louise ; Wand, Handan ; Ward, James ; Liu, Bette. / Hospitalisations for pelvic inflammatory disease temporally related to a diagnosis of chlamydia or gonorrhoea : A retrospective cohort study. In: PLoS ONE. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 4.
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title = "Hospitalisations for pelvic inflammatory disease temporally related to a diagnosis of chlamydia or gonorrhoea: A retrospective cohort study",
abstract = "Objectives: The presence and severity of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) symptoms are thought to vary by microbiological etiology but there is limited empirical evidence. We sought to estimate and compare the rates of hospitalisation for PID temporally related to diagnoses of gonorrhoea and chlamydia. Methods: All women, aged 15-45 years in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW), with a diagnosis of chlamydia or gonorrhoea between 01/07/2000 and 31/12/2008 were followed by record linkage for up to one year after their chlamydia or gonorrhoea diagnosis for hospitalisations for PID. Standardised incidence ratios compared the incidence of PID hospitalisations to the age-equivalent NSW population. Results: A total of 38,193 women had a chlamydia diagnosis, of which 483 were hospitalised for PID; incidence rate (IR) 13.9 per 1000 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) (95{\%}CI 12.6-15.1). In contrast, 1015 had a gonorrhoea diagnosis, of which 45 were hospitalised for PID (IR 50.8 per 1000 PYFU, 95{\%}CI 36.0-65.6). The annual incidence of PID hospitalisation temporally related to a chlamydia or gonorrhoea diagnosis was 27.0 (95{\%}CI 24.4-29.8) and 96.6 (95{\%}CI 64.7-138.8) times greater, respectively, than the age-equivalent NSW female population. Younger age, socio-economic disadvantage, having a diagnosis prior to 2005 and having a prior birth were also associated with being hospitalised for PID. Conclusions: Chlamydia and gonorrhoea are both associated with large increases in the risk of PID hospitalisation. Our data suggest the risk of PID hospitalisation is much higher for gonorrhoea than chlamydia; however, further research is needed to confirm this finding. Copyright:",
author = "Joanne Reekie and Basil Donovan and Rebecca Guy and Hocking, {Jane S.} and Louisa Jorm and Kaldor, {John M.} and Mak, {Donna B.} and David Preen and Sallie Pearson and Roberts, {Christine L.} and Louise Stewart and Handan Wand and James Ward and Bette Liu",
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Reekie, J, Donovan, B, Guy, R, Hocking, JS, Jorm, L, Kaldor, JM, Mak, DB, Preen, D, Pearson, S, Roberts, CL, Stewart, L, Wand, H, Ward, J & Liu, B 2014, 'Hospitalisations for pelvic inflammatory disease temporally related to a diagnosis of chlamydia or gonorrhoea: A retrospective cohort study', PLoS ONE, vol. 9, no. 4, e94361. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0094361

Hospitalisations for pelvic inflammatory disease temporally related to a diagnosis of chlamydia or gonorrhoea : A retrospective cohort study. / Reekie, Joanne; Donovan, Basil; Guy, Rebecca; Hocking, Jane S.; Jorm, Louisa; Kaldor, John M.; Mak, Donna B.; Preen, David; Pearson, Sallie; Roberts, Christine L.; Stewart, Louise; Wand, Handan; Ward, James; Liu, Bette.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 9, No. 4, e94361, 17.04.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hospitalisations for pelvic inflammatory disease temporally related to a diagnosis of chlamydia or gonorrhoea

T2 - PLoS ONE

AU - Reekie, Joanne

AU - Donovan, Basil

AU - Guy, Rebecca

AU - Hocking, Jane S.

AU - Jorm, Louisa

AU - Kaldor, John M.

AU - Mak, Donna B.

AU - Preen, David

AU - Pearson, Sallie

AU - Roberts, Christine L.

AU - Stewart, Louise

AU - Wand, Handan

AU - Ward, James

AU - Liu, Bette

PY - 2014/4/17

Y1 - 2014/4/17

N2 - Objectives: The presence and severity of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) symptoms are thought to vary by microbiological etiology but there is limited empirical evidence. We sought to estimate and compare the rates of hospitalisation for PID temporally related to diagnoses of gonorrhoea and chlamydia. Methods: All women, aged 15-45 years in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW), with a diagnosis of chlamydia or gonorrhoea between 01/07/2000 and 31/12/2008 were followed by record linkage for up to one year after their chlamydia or gonorrhoea diagnosis for hospitalisations for PID. Standardised incidence ratios compared the incidence of PID hospitalisations to the age-equivalent NSW population. Results: A total of 38,193 women had a chlamydia diagnosis, of which 483 were hospitalised for PID; incidence rate (IR) 13.9 per 1000 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) (95%CI 12.6-15.1). In contrast, 1015 had a gonorrhoea diagnosis, of which 45 were hospitalised for PID (IR 50.8 per 1000 PYFU, 95%CI 36.0-65.6). The annual incidence of PID hospitalisation temporally related to a chlamydia or gonorrhoea diagnosis was 27.0 (95%CI 24.4-29.8) and 96.6 (95%CI 64.7-138.8) times greater, respectively, than the age-equivalent NSW female population. Younger age, socio-economic disadvantage, having a diagnosis prior to 2005 and having a prior birth were also associated with being hospitalised for PID. Conclusions: Chlamydia and gonorrhoea are both associated with large increases in the risk of PID hospitalisation. Our data suggest the risk of PID hospitalisation is much higher for gonorrhoea than chlamydia; however, further research is needed to confirm this finding. Copyright:

AB - Objectives: The presence and severity of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) symptoms are thought to vary by microbiological etiology but there is limited empirical evidence. We sought to estimate and compare the rates of hospitalisation for PID temporally related to diagnoses of gonorrhoea and chlamydia. Methods: All women, aged 15-45 years in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW), with a diagnosis of chlamydia or gonorrhoea between 01/07/2000 and 31/12/2008 were followed by record linkage for up to one year after their chlamydia or gonorrhoea diagnosis for hospitalisations for PID. Standardised incidence ratios compared the incidence of PID hospitalisations to the age-equivalent NSW population. Results: A total of 38,193 women had a chlamydia diagnosis, of which 483 were hospitalised for PID; incidence rate (IR) 13.9 per 1000 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) (95%CI 12.6-15.1). In contrast, 1015 had a gonorrhoea diagnosis, of which 45 were hospitalised for PID (IR 50.8 per 1000 PYFU, 95%CI 36.0-65.6). The annual incidence of PID hospitalisation temporally related to a chlamydia or gonorrhoea diagnosis was 27.0 (95%CI 24.4-29.8) and 96.6 (95%CI 64.7-138.8) times greater, respectively, than the age-equivalent NSW female population. Younger age, socio-economic disadvantage, having a diagnosis prior to 2005 and having a prior birth were also associated with being hospitalised for PID. Conclusions: Chlamydia and gonorrhoea are both associated with large increases in the risk of PID hospitalisation. Our data suggest the risk of PID hospitalisation is much higher for gonorrhoea than chlamydia; however, further research is needed to confirm this finding. Copyright:

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