Hormone replacement therapies in women at risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis in South Australia in 1997

Alastair H. Maclennan, David H. Wilson, Anne W. Taylor

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15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe changes in use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in an Australian population and to determine HRT use in women at risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporotic fracture. Design: Data were derived from the 1997 South Australian Health Omnibus Survey (a representative population survey) and compared with data from 1991, 1993 and 1995 Omnibus Surveys. Setting: South Australia, 1997. Participants: 1049 women aged 40 years and over from a random selection of 4400 households. Results: Among women aged 55-64 years (and thus likely to be postmenopausal), 60% had used HRT (ever use). Nearly two-thirds of these women used it currently. In this age group, mean length of HRT use had increased to 70 months (median, 60 months). Rates of HRT use had not changed significantly between 1991 and 1997 in women under 55 years, but had increased significantly in women aged 55 years or over (P ≤ 0.01). Among women currently using HRT, 5.4% had used testosterone therapy, while 4% used unregistered products purported to contain hormones. Rates of ever use of HRT in women with zero, one, two, or three or more cardiovascular risk factors were 33%, 37%, 37%, and 45%, respectively. Among women with a diagnosis of osteoporosis, 52% had used HRT, with a mean length of use of 86 months (median, 60 months). Conclusion: HRT use is increasing in older-age groups. Longer-term therapy with potential for primary prevention is now occurring, but half of those with osteoporosis and more than half of those with risk factors for cardiovascular disease have not used HRT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)524-527
Number of pages4
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume170
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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