Growth and development performance of the ubiquitous urban mosquito Aedes notoscriptus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Australia varies with water type and temperature

Craig Williams, Gina Rau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The container-breeding mosquito, Aedes notoscriptus, is a common nuisance biter throughout Australia and has been implicated in arbovirus transmission in urban areas. Here detailed growth and development data for this species at a range of temperatures from laboratory observations were provided. Larvae of Ae. notoscriptus were amenable to laboratory rearing at 15-29°C, but not at 35°C, at which no larvae survived beyond instar I. Overall survival to pupation was better in rainwater (96.7%) compared with tap water (85%). Larval development time shortened with increasing temperature, with time to pupation across all temperatures ranging from 48.8 to 7.6days in tap water and 16.2 to 6.8days in rainwater. Such hastened development resulted in smaller mosquitoes, with decreases in wing length of up to 19%. Ovary size was greatest at 18-25°C. In general, Ae. notoscriptus developed more quickly to a larger size, with larger ovaries in rainwater compared with tap water. Collectively, these findings indicate an optimum temperature range to maximise fitness of 18-29°C. However, significant variability in growth and development of this species in the field is likely, given the range of water qualities and temperatures likely to be encountered. Data presented here will be required for future population modelling to assess the impact of a changing climate on this important urban nuisance and disease vector species.

LanguageEnglish
Pages195-199
Number of pages5
JournalAustralian Journal of Entomology
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aedes notoscriptus
  • Development
  • Growth
  • Reproductive capacity
  • Temperature
  • Water quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Insect Science

Cite this

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title = "Growth and development performance of the ubiquitous urban mosquito Aedes notoscriptus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Australia varies with water type and temperature",
abstract = "The container-breeding mosquito, Aedes notoscriptus, is a common nuisance biter throughout Australia and has been implicated in arbovirus transmission in urban areas. Here detailed growth and development data for this species at a range of temperatures from laboratory observations were provided. Larvae of Ae. notoscriptus were amenable to laboratory rearing at 15-29°C, but not at 35°C, at which no larvae survived beyond instar I. Overall survival to pupation was better in rainwater (96.7{\%}) compared with tap water (85{\%}). Larval development time shortened with increasing temperature, with time to pupation across all temperatures ranging from 48.8 to 7.6days in tap water and 16.2 to 6.8days in rainwater. Such hastened development resulted in smaller mosquitoes, with decreases in wing length of up to 19{\%}. Ovary size was greatest at 18-25°C. In general, Ae. notoscriptus developed more quickly to a larger size, with larger ovaries in rainwater compared with tap water. Collectively, these findings indicate an optimum temperature range to maximise fitness of 18-29°C. However, significant variability in growth and development of this species in the field is likely, given the range of water qualities and temperatures likely to be encountered. Data presented here will be required for future population modelling to assess the impact of a changing climate on this important urban nuisance and disease vector species.",
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