Global and societal implications of the diabetes epidemic

Paul Zimmet, K. G.M.M. Alberti, Jonathan Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4048 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Changes in human behaviour and lifestyle over the last century have resulted in a dramatic increase in the incidence of diabetes worldwide. The epidemic is chiefly of type 2 diabetes and also the associated conditions known as 'diabesity' and 'metabolic syndrome'. In conjunction with genetic susceptibility, particularly in certain ethnic groups, type 2 diabetes is brought on by environmental and behavioural factors such as a sedentary lifestyle, overly rich nutrition and obesity. The prevention of diabetes and control of its micro- and macrovascular complications will require an integrated, international approach if we are to see significant reduction in the huge premature morbidity and mortality it causes.

LanguageEnglish
Pages782-787
Number of pages6
JournalNature
Volume414
Issue number6865
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Dec 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Zimmet, P., Alberti, K. G. M. M., & Shaw, J. (2001). Global and societal implications of the diabetes epidemic. Nature, 414(6865), 782-787. https://doi.org/10.1038/414782a
Zimmet, Paul ; Alberti, K. G.M.M. ; Shaw, Jonathan. / Global and societal implications of the diabetes epidemic. In: Nature. 2001 ; Vol. 414, No. 6865. pp. 782-787.
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Zimmet, P, Alberti, KGMM & Shaw, J 2001, 'Global and societal implications of the diabetes epidemic', Nature, vol. 414, no. 6865, pp. 782-787. https://doi.org/10.1038/414782a

Global and societal implications of the diabetes epidemic. / Zimmet, Paul; Alberti, K. G.M.M.; Shaw, Jonathan.

In: Nature, Vol. 414, No. 6865, 13.12.2001, p. 782-787.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Zimmet P, Alberti KGMM, Shaw J. Global and societal implications of the diabetes epidemic. Nature. 2001 Dec 13;414(6865):782-787. https://doi.org/10.1038/414782a