Exploring the epidemiological characteristics of cancers of unknown primary site in an Australian population: Implications for research and clinical care

Colin Luke, Bogda Koczwara, Christos Karapetis, Ken Pittman, Tim Price, Dusan Kotasek, Kerri Beckmann, Michael P. Brown, David Roder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate incidence, mortality and case survival trends for cancer of unknown primary site (CUP) and consider clinical implications. Method: South Australian Cancer Registry data were used to calculate age-standardised incidence and mortality rates from 1977 to 2004. Disease-specific survivals, socio-demographic, histological and secular predictors of CUP, compared with cancers of known primary site, and of CUP histological types, using multivariable logistic regression were investigated. Results: Incidence and mortality rates increased approximately 60% between 1977-80 and 1981-84. Rates peaked in 1993-96. Male to female incidence and mortality rate ratios approximated 1.3:1. Incidence and mortality rates increased with age. The odds of unspecified histological type, compared with the more common adenocarcinomas, were higher for males than females, non-metropolitan residents, low socio-economic areas, and for 1977-88 than subsequent diagnostic periods. CUP represented a higher proportion of cancers in Indigenous patients. Case survival was 7% at 10 years from diagnosis. Factors predictive of lower case survival included older age, male sex, Indigenous status, lower socio-economic status, and unspecified histology type. Conclusion: Results point to poor CUP outcomes, but with a modest improvement in survival. The study identifies sociodemographic groups at elevated risk of CUP and of worse treatment outcomes where increased research and clinical attention are required.

LanguageEnglish
Pages383-389
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian and New Zealand journal of public health
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cancer unknown primary
  • Incidence
  • Mortality
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Luke, Colin ; Koczwara, Bogda ; Karapetis, Christos ; Pittman, Ken ; Price, Tim ; Kotasek, Dusan ; Beckmann, Kerri ; Brown, Michael P. ; Roder, David. / Exploring the epidemiological characteristics of cancers of unknown primary site in an Australian population : Implications for research and clinical care. In: Australian and New Zealand journal of public health. 2008 ; Vol. 32, No. 4. pp. 383-389.
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Exploring the epidemiological characteristics of cancers of unknown primary site in an Australian population : Implications for research and clinical care. / Luke, Colin; Koczwara, Bogda; Karapetis, Christos; Pittman, Ken; Price, Tim; Kotasek, Dusan; Beckmann, Kerri; Brown, Michael P.; Roder, David.

In: Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, Vol. 32, No. 4, 01.08.2008, p. 383-389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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