Ex vivo culture of human prostate tissue and drug development

Margaret M. Centenera, Ganesh V. Raj, Karen E. Knudsen, Wayne D. Tilley, Lisa M. Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although an array of new therapeutics exist for prostate cancer, the development of agents that can improve outcomes for men with prostate cancer remains inefficient, costly, and frustratingly slow. A major impediment to the clinical translation of research findings is the lack of preclinical models that can accurately predict the clinical efficacy of new drugs and, therefore, enable the selection of agents that are most suitable for clinical trials. An approach that is gaining popularity in the prostate cancer community is ex vivo culture of primary human tissues, which retains the native tissue architecture, hormone responsiveness, and cell-to-cell signalling of the tumour microenvironment in a dynamic and manipulable state. Ex vivo culture systems recapitulate the structural complexity and heterogeneity of human prostate cancers in a laboratory setting, making them an important adjunct to current cell-line-based and animal-based models. When incorporated into preclinical studies, ex vivo cultured tissues enable robust quantitative evaluation of clinically relevant end points representing drug efficacy, investigation of therapy resistance, and biomarker discovery. By providing new clinically relevant insights into prostate carcinogenesis, it is likely that ex vivo culture will enhance drug development programmes and improve the translational 'hit rate' for prostate cancer research.

LanguageEnglish
Pages483-487
Number of pages5
JournalNature Reviews Urology
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Centenera, Margaret M. ; Raj, Ganesh V. ; Knudsen, Karen E. ; Tilley, Wayne D. ; Butler, Lisa M. / Ex vivo culture of human prostate tissue and drug development. In: Nature Reviews Urology. 2013 ; Vol. 10, No. 8. pp. 483-487.
@article{4014413efe54472d95df223bb5428dcb,
title = "Ex vivo culture of human prostate tissue and drug development",
abstract = "Although an array of new therapeutics exist for prostate cancer, the development of agents that can improve outcomes for men with prostate cancer remains inefficient, costly, and frustratingly slow. A major impediment to the clinical translation of research findings is the lack of preclinical models that can accurately predict the clinical efficacy of new drugs and, therefore, enable the selection of agents that are most suitable for clinical trials. An approach that is gaining popularity in the prostate cancer community is ex vivo culture of primary human tissues, which retains the native tissue architecture, hormone responsiveness, and cell-to-cell signalling of the tumour microenvironment in a dynamic and manipulable state. Ex vivo culture systems recapitulate the structural complexity and heterogeneity of human prostate cancers in a laboratory setting, making them an important adjunct to current cell-line-based and animal-based models. When incorporated into preclinical studies, ex vivo cultured tissues enable robust quantitative evaluation of clinically relevant end points representing drug efficacy, investigation of therapy resistance, and biomarker discovery. By providing new clinically relevant insights into prostate carcinogenesis, it is likely that ex vivo culture will enhance drug development programmes and improve the translational 'hit rate' for prostate cancer research.",
author = "Centenera, {Margaret M.} and Raj, {Ganesh V.} and Knudsen, {Karen E.} and Tilley, {Wayne D.} and Butler, {Lisa M.}",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/nrurol.2013.126",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "483--487",
journal = "Nature Reviews Urology",
issn = "1759-4812",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "8",

}

Ex vivo culture of human prostate tissue and drug development. / Centenera, Margaret M.; Raj, Ganesh V.; Knudsen, Karen E.; Tilley, Wayne D.; Butler, Lisa M.

In: Nature Reviews Urology, Vol. 10, No. 8, 01.08.2013, p. 483-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ex vivo culture of human prostate tissue and drug development

AU - Centenera, Margaret M.

AU - Raj, Ganesh V.

AU - Knudsen, Karen E.

AU - Tilley, Wayne D.

AU - Butler, Lisa M.

PY - 2013/8/1

Y1 - 2013/8/1

N2 - Although an array of new therapeutics exist for prostate cancer, the development of agents that can improve outcomes for men with prostate cancer remains inefficient, costly, and frustratingly slow. A major impediment to the clinical translation of research findings is the lack of preclinical models that can accurately predict the clinical efficacy of new drugs and, therefore, enable the selection of agents that are most suitable for clinical trials. An approach that is gaining popularity in the prostate cancer community is ex vivo culture of primary human tissues, which retains the native tissue architecture, hormone responsiveness, and cell-to-cell signalling of the tumour microenvironment in a dynamic and manipulable state. Ex vivo culture systems recapitulate the structural complexity and heterogeneity of human prostate cancers in a laboratory setting, making them an important adjunct to current cell-line-based and animal-based models. When incorporated into preclinical studies, ex vivo cultured tissues enable robust quantitative evaluation of clinically relevant end points representing drug efficacy, investigation of therapy resistance, and biomarker discovery. By providing new clinically relevant insights into prostate carcinogenesis, it is likely that ex vivo culture will enhance drug development programmes and improve the translational 'hit rate' for prostate cancer research.

AB - Although an array of new therapeutics exist for prostate cancer, the development of agents that can improve outcomes for men with prostate cancer remains inefficient, costly, and frustratingly slow. A major impediment to the clinical translation of research findings is the lack of preclinical models that can accurately predict the clinical efficacy of new drugs and, therefore, enable the selection of agents that are most suitable for clinical trials. An approach that is gaining popularity in the prostate cancer community is ex vivo culture of primary human tissues, which retains the native tissue architecture, hormone responsiveness, and cell-to-cell signalling of the tumour microenvironment in a dynamic and manipulable state. Ex vivo culture systems recapitulate the structural complexity and heterogeneity of human prostate cancers in a laboratory setting, making them an important adjunct to current cell-line-based and animal-based models. When incorporated into preclinical studies, ex vivo cultured tissues enable robust quantitative evaluation of clinically relevant end points representing drug efficacy, investigation of therapy resistance, and biomarker discovery. By providing new clinically relevant insights into prostate carcinogenesis, it is likely that ex vivo culture will enhance drug development programmes and improve the translational 'hit rate' for prostate cancer research.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84881612540&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nrurol.2013.126

DO - 10.1038/nrurol.2013.126

M3 - Review article

VL - 10

SP - 483

EP - 487

JO - Nature Reviews Urology

T2 - Nature Reviews Urology

JF - Nature Reviews Urology

SN - 1759-4812

IS - 8

ER -