Epigenetic Regulation of Bone Marrow Stem Cell Aging: Revealing Epigenetic Signatures associated with Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Aging

D. Cakouros, Stan Gronthos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this review we explore the importance of epigenetics as a contributing factor for aging adult stem cells. We summarize the latest findings of epigenetic factors deregulated as adult stem cells age and the consequence on stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, with a focus on adult stem cells in the bone marrow.
With the latest whole genome bisulphite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitations we are able to decipher an emerging pattern common for adult stem cells in the bone marrow niche and how this might correlate to epigenetic enzymes deregulated during aging. We begin by briefly discussing the initial observations in yeast, drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) that led to the breakthrough research that identified the role of epigenetic changes associated with lifespan and aging. We then focus on adult stem cells, specifically in the bone marrow, which lends strong support for the deregulation of DNA methyltransferases, histone deacetylases, acetylates, methyltransferases and demethylases in aging stem cells, and how their corresponding epigenetic modifications influence gene expression and the aging phenotype. Given the reversible nature of epigenetic modifications we envisage “epi” targeted therapy as a means to reprogram aged stem cells into their younger counterparts.
LanguageEnglish
Pages174-189
Number of pages16
JournalAging and Disease
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2019

Keywords

  • Chromatin
  • Histone
  • HSC
  • Methylation
  • MSC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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Epigenetic Regulation of Bone Marrow Stem Cell Aging : Revealing Epigenetic Signatures associated with Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Aging. / Cakouros, D.; Gronthos, Stan.

In: Aging and Disease, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.02.2019, p. 174-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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