Dietary substitution with an α-linolenic acid-rich vegetable oil increases eicosapentaenoic acid concentrations in tissues

E. Mantzioris, M. J. James, R. A. Gibson, L. G. Cleland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

236 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thirty healthy male volunteers were randomly allocated into two dietary treatment groups. The flaxseed group (n = 15) maintained a diet high in α- linolenic acid (α-LA; 18:3n-3) and low in linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6) by using a flaxseed oil and spread that are high in α-LA. The control group (n = 15) maintained a diet high in LA and low in α-LA, typifying a Western diet. Both groups maintained their diets for 4 wk, followed by another 4-wk period in which they supplemented the diets with fish oil [1.62 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) daily and 1.08 g docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) daily] in a triglyceride form. The flaxseed oil-containing diet resulted in significant increases in ←a-LA concentrations in the plasma phospholipid, cholesteryl ester, and triglyceride fractions (eightfold increase) and neutrophil phospholipids (50% increase). EPA concentrations increased by 2.5-fold in the plasma lipid fractions and neutrophil phospholipids. After fish-oil supplementation EPA concentrations increased in parallel in both dietary groups, remaining higher in the flaxseed group for both the plasma lipid fractions and neutrophil phospholipids. The results indicate that α-LA-rich vegetable oils can be used in a domestic setting (in conjunction with a background diet low in LA) to elevate EPA in tissues to concentrations comparable with those associated with fish-oil supplementation.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1304-1309
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume59
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1994
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

@article{4ac42fa9e8e94b4ea21d32d07e413cb6,
title = "Dietary substitution with an α-linolenic acid-rich vegetable oil increases eicosapentaenoic acid concentrations in tissues",
abstract = "Thirty healthy male volunteers were randomly allocated into two dietary treatment groups. The flaxseed group (n = 15) maintained a diet high in α- linolenic acid (α-LA; 18:3n-3) and low in linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6) by using a flaxseed oil and spread that are high in α-LA. The control group (n = 15) maintained a diet high in LA and low in α-LA, typifying a Western diet. Both groups maintained their diets for 4 wk, followed by another 4-wk period in which they supplemented the diets with fish oil [1.62 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) daily and 1.08 g docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) daily] in a triglyceride form. The flaxseed oil-containing diet resulted in significant increases in ←a-LA concentrations in the plasma phospholipid, cholesteryl ester, and triglyceride fractions (eightfold increase) and neutrophil phospholipids (50{\%} increase). EPA concentrations increased by 2.5-fold in the plasma lipid fractions and neutrophil phospholipids. After fish-oil supplementation EPA concentrations increased in parallel in both dietary groups, remaining higher in the flaxseed group for both the plasma lipid fractions and neutrophil phospholipids. The results indicate that α-LA-rich vegetable oils can be used in a domestic setting (in conjunction with a background diet low in LA) to elevate EPA in tissues to concentrations comparable with those associated with fish-oil supplementation.",
author = "E. Mantzioris and James, {M. J.} and Gibson, {R. A.} and Cleland, {L. G.}",
year = "1994",
month = "6",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "1304--1309",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "6",

}

Dietary substitution with an α-linolenic acid-rich vegetable oil increases eicosapentaenoic acid concentrations in tissues. / Mantzioris, E.; James, M. J.; Gibson, R. A.; Cleland, L. G.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 59, No. 6, 06.1994, p. 1304-1309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary substitution with an α-linolenic acid-rich vegetable oil increases eicosapentaenoic acid concentrations in tissues

AU - Mantzioris, E.

AU - James, M. J.

AU - Gibson, R. A.

AU - Cleland, L. G.

PY - 1994/6

Y1 - 1994/6

N2 - Thirty healthy male volunteers were randomly allocated into two dietary treatment groups. The flaxseed group (n = 15) maintained a diet high in α- linolenic acid (α-LA; 18:3n-3) and low in linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6) by using a flaxseed oil and spread that are high in α-LA. The control group (n = 15) maintained a diet high in LA and low in α-LA, typifying a Western diet. Both groups maintained their diets for 4 wk, followed by another 4-wk period in which they supplemented the diets with fish oil [1.62 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) daily and 1.08 g docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) daily] in a triglyceride form. The flaxseed oil-containing diet resulted in significant increases in ←a-LA concentrations in the plasma phospholipid, cholesteryl ester, and triglyceride fractions (eightfold increase) and neutrophil phospholipids (50% increase). EPA concentrations increased by 2.5-fold in the plasma lipid fractions and neutrophil phospholipids. After fish-oil supplementation EPA concentrations increased in parallel in both dietary groups, remaining higher in the flaxseed group for both the plasma lipid fractions and neutrophil phospholipids. The results indicate that α-LA-rich vegetable oils can be used in a domestic setting (in conjunction with a background diet low in LA) to elevate EPA in tissues to concentrations comparable with those associated with fish-oil supplementation.

AB - Thirty healthy male volunteers were randomly allocated into two dietary treatment groups. The flaxseed group (n = 15) maintained a diet high in α- linolenic acid (α-LA; 18:3n-3) and low in linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6) by using a flaxseed oil and spread that are high in α-LA. The control group (n = 15) maintained a diet high in LA and low in α-LA, typifying a Western diet. Both groups maintained their diets for 4 wk, followed by another 4-wk period in which they supplemented the diets with fish oil [1.62 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) daily and 1.08 g docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) daily] in a triglyceride form. The flaxseed oil-containing diet resulted in significant increases in ←a-LA concentrations in the plasma phospholipid, cholesteryl ester, and triglyceride fractions (eightfold increase) and neutrophil phospholipids (50% increase). EPA concentrations increased by 2.5-fold in the plasma lipid fractions and neutrophil phospholipids. After fish-oil supplementation EPA concentrations increased in parallel in both dietary groups, remaining higher in the flaxseed group for both the plasma lipid fractions and neutrophil phospholipids. The results indicate that α-LA-rich vegetable oils can be used in a domestic setting (in conjunction with a background diet low in LA) to elevate EPA in tissues to concentrations comparable with those associated with fish-oil supplementation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028177021&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 1304

EP - 1309

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

T2 - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 6

ER -