Developing an ecological framework of factors associated with substance use and related harms among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: Protocol for a systematic review

Mieke Snijder, Briana Lees, James Ward, Annalee E. Stearne, Nicola Clare Newton, Lexine Stapinski

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience high rates of substance use and related harms. Previous prevention programmes and policies have met with limited success, particularly among youth, and this may be a result of inadequately targeting the unique risk and protective factors associated with substance use for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The purpose of this systematic review is to therefore synthesise the risk and protective factors associated with substance use and related harms among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and critically appraise the methodological quality of the included studies. Methods and analysis A total of seven peer-reviewed (Cochrane, Embase, PsychInfo, Medline, ProQuest, Informit, and CINAHL) and two grey literature (HeathInfoNet and Closing the Gap Clearinghouse) databases will be systematically searched using search terms in line with the aims of this review and based on previous relevant reviews. Studies published between 1 January 1990 and 31 April 2018 will be included if they identify risk and/or protective factors for substance use or related harms in a study sample that consists of at least 50% Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. A narrative synthesis will be undertaken where the identified factors will be organised using an ecological approach into individual, relationship, community, societal and cultural levels. A critical appraisal of study quality will be conducted using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist for Studies Reporting Prevalence Data and the qualitative assessment tool by Godfrey and Long. Ethics and dissemination Formal ethics approval is not required as primary data will not be collected. The results will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication, conference presentations and social media. PROSPERO registration number CRD42017073734.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere024418
JournalBMJ open
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019

Keywords

  • aboriginal and torres strait islander people
  • indigenous
  • other drug
  • protective factors
  • risk factors
  • substance use
  • tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this