Comparison of the effects of weight loss from a high-protein versus standard-protein energy-restricted diet on strength and aerobic capacity in overweight and obese men

Thomas P. Wycherley, Jonathan D. Buckley, Manny Noakes, Peter M. Clifton, Grant D. Brinkworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To compare the effects of two low-fat, hypoenergetic diets differing in carbohydrate-to-protein ratio, on strength and aerobic capacity measures in overweight and obese men. Methods: In a parallel design, 56 men (age, 45.5 ± 8.7 years; BMI, 33.6 ± 3.9 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to a low-fat, energy-restricted diet (7,000 kJ/day) with either high protein (HP: protein/carbohydrate/fat % energy, 35:40:25) or standard protein (SP, 17:58:25). Body weight, body composition, muscle strength and aerobic capacity were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. Results: Forty-two participants completed the study (HP, n = 21; SP, n = 21). Both groups experienced similar reductions in body weight (HP, -10.7 ± 5.3 kg [-9.8%]; SP, -8.7 ± 3.5 kg [-8.4%]) and fat-free mass (HP, -2.8 ± 3.6 kg; SP, -3.2 ± 2.7 kg; P < 0.001 time; P > 0.14 time × group interaction). There was a trend for a greater reduction in fat mass in the HP diet group, (-7.7 ± 4.3 kg [-21.2%] vs. -5.4 ± 3.3 kg [-15.1%]; P < 0.001 time; P = 0.06 time × group interaction). Absolute peak oxygen uptake did not change in either group (P = 0.39 time; P = 0.50 time × group interaction). Overall, in both groups, relative peak oxygen uptake increased (2.9 ± 2.8 ml kg-1 min-1 [8.9%]), peak isometric knee extensor strength increased (14.1 ± 35.7 Nm [7.1%]) and peak handgrip strength decreased (-1.6 ± 4.1 kg [-3%]) (P ≤ 0.02 time for all), with no diet effect (P ≤ 0.23 time × group interaction). Conclusion: In overweight and obese men, both a HP and SP diet reduced body weight and improved body composition with similar effects on strength and aerobic capacity.

LanguageEnglish
Pages317-325
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Nutrition
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2013

Keywords

  • Diet composition
  • Exercise capacity
  • Nutrition
  • Physical function
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Wycherley, Thomas P. ; Buckley, Jonathan D. ; Noakes, Manny ; Clifton, Peter M. ; Brinkworth, Grant D. / Comparison of the effects of weight loss from a high-protein versus standard-protein energy-restricted diet on strength and aerobic capacity in overweight and obese men. In: European Journal of Nutrition. 2013 ; Vol. 52, No. 1. pp. 317-325.
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Comparison of the effects of weight loss from a high-protein versus standard-protein energy-restricted diet on strength and aerobic capacity in overweight and obese men. / Wycherley, Thomas P.; Buckley, Jonathan D.; Noakes, Manny; Clifton, Peter M.; Brinkworth, Grant D.

In: European Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 52, No. 1, 01.02.2013, p. 317-325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of the effects of weight loss from a high-protein versus standard-protein energy-restricted diet on strength and aerobic capacity in overweight and obese men

AU - Wycherley, Thomas P.

AU - Buckley, Jonathan D.

AU - Noakes, Manny

AU - Clifton, Peter M.

AU - Brinkworth, Grant D.

PY - 2013/2/1

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N2 - Purpose: To compare the effects of two low-fat, hypoenergetic diets differing in carbohydrate-to-protein ratio, on strength and aerobic capacity measures in overweight and obese men. Methods: In a parallel design, 56 men (age, 45.5 ± 8.7 years; BMI, 33.6 ± 3.9 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to a low-fat, energy-restricted diet (7,000 kJ/day) with either high protein (HP: protein/carbohydrate/fat % energy, 35:40:25) or standard protein (SP, 17:58:25). Body weight, body composition, muscle strength and aerobic capacity were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. Results: Forty-two participants completed the study (HP, n = 21; SP, n = 21). Both groups experienced similar reductions in body weight (HP, -10.7 ± 5.3 kg [-9.8%]; SP, -8.7 ± 3.5 kg [-8.4%]) and fat-free mass (HP, -2.8 ± 3.6 kg; SP, -3.2 ± 2.7 kg; P < 0.001 time; P > 0.14 time × group interaction). There was a trend for a greater reduction in fat mass in the HP diet group, (-7.7 ± 4.3 kg [-21.2%] vs. -5.4 ± 3.3 kg [-15.1%]; P < 0.001 time; P = 0.06 time × group interaction). Absolute peak oxygen uptake did not change in either group (P = 0.39 time; P = 0.50 time × group interaction). Overall, in both groups, relative peak oxygen uptake increased (2.9 ± 2.8 ml kg-1 min-1 [8.9%]), peak isometric knee extensor strength increased (14.1 ± 35.7 Nm [7.1%]) and peak handgrip strength decreased (-1.6 ± 4.1 kg [-3%]) (P ≤ 0.02 time for all), with no diet effect (P ≤ 0.23 time × group interaction). Conclusion: In overweight and obese men, both a HP and SP diet reduced body weight and improved body composition with similar effects on strength and aerobic capacity.

AB - Purpose: To compare the effects of two low-fat, hypoenergetic diets differing in carbohydrate-to-protein ratio, on strength and aerobic capacity measures in overweight and obese men. Methods: In a parallel design, 56 men (age, 45.5 ± 8.7 years; BMI, 33.6 ± 3.9 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to a low-fat, energy-restricted diet (7,000 kJ/day) with either high protein (HP: protein/carbohydrate/fat % energy, 35:40:25) or standard protein (SP, 17:58:25). Body weight, body composition, muscle strength and aerobic capacity were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. Results: Forty-two participants completed the study (HP, n = 21; SP, n = 21). Both groups experienced similar reductions in body weight (HP, -10.7 ± 5.3 kg [-9.8%]; SP, -8.7 ± 3.5 kg [-8.4%]) and fat-free mass (HP, -2.8 ± 3.6 kg; SP, -3.2 ± 2.7 kg; P < 0.001 time; P > 0.14 time × group interaction). There was a trend for a greater reduction in fat mass in the HP diet group, (-7.7 ± 4.3 kg [-21.2%] vs. -5.4 ± 3.3 kg [-15.1%]; P < 0.001 time; P = 0.06 time × group interaction). Absolute peak oxygen uptake did not change in either group (P = 0.39 time; P = 0.50 time × group interaction). Overall, in both groups, relative peak oxygen uptake increased (2.9 ± 2.8 ml kg-1 min-1 [8.9%]), peak isometric knee extensor strength increased (14.1 ± 35.7 Nm [7.1%]) and peak handgrip strength decreased (-1.6 ± 4.1 kg [-3%]) (P ≤ 0.02 time for all), with no diet effect (P ≤ 0.23 time × group interaction). Conclusion: In overweight and obese men, both a HP and SP diet reduced body weight and improved body composition with similar effects on strength and aerobic capacity.

KW - Diet composition

KW - Exercise capacity

KW - Nutrition

KW - Physical function

KW - Weight loss

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JO - European Journal of Nutrition

T2 - European Journal of Nutrition

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