Cohort analysis of a 24-week randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a novel, partial meal replacement program targetingweight loss and risk factor reduction in overweight/obese adults

Emily Brindal, Gilly A. Hendrie, Pennie Taylor, Jill Freyne, Manny Noakes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our aim was to design and evaluate a weight-loss program, including a partial meal replacement program, point-of-care testing and face-to-face and smartphone app support, appropriate for delivery in a community pharmacy setting. Overweight or obese adults (n = 146, 71.2% female, 48.18 ± 11.75 years old) were recruited to participate in a 24-week weight loss study and randomised to two app conditions. The dietary intervention was consistent regardless of app. Twelve weeks of clinic appointments with a trained consultant were followed by only app support for an additional 12 weeks. By week 24, retention was 57.5%. There were no differences between app conditions. Based on a cohort analysis of the trial, the mean decrease in weight from baseline to week 24 was 6.43 ± 1.06 kg for males (p < 0.001) and 5.66 ± 0.70 kg for females (p < 0.001). Mixed models also revealed decreases for LDL Cholesterol (−0.13 ± 0.08 mmol/L, nonsignificant), triglycerides (−0.08 ± 0.05 mmol/L, nonsignificant) and an increase in HDL cholesterol (+0.08 ± 0.04 mmol/L, ns) were not significant by week 24. Blood glucose (−0.23 ± 0.08 mmol/L, p = 0.040) and blood pressure (Systolic blood pressure −5.77 ± 1.21 Hg/mm, p < 0.001) were significantly lower at week 24 compared to baseline. Weight loss self-efficacy increased and remained significantly higher than baseline at week 24 (16.85 ± 2.93, p < 0.001). Overall, the program supported participants and was successful in achieving significant weight loss and improvements in health outcomes over 24 weeks.

Original languageEnglish
Article number265
JournalNutrients
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2016

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Meal replacement
  • Pharmacy
  • Smartphone
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this