Cervical Cancer in South Australia: Trends in Incidence, Mortality and Case Survival

A. Bonett, M. Davy, D. Roder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: Approximately 90% of cervical cancers are considered preventable through regular screening and the treatment of precursor lesions, but fewer than 20% of South Australian women were found to have been screened in 1984. Data from the State Cancer Registry have shown an increase in cervical cancer incidence of approximately 80% in women under 50 years of age in the 9‐year period to 1986, but a decrease of about 25% in older women. Mortality data have shown similar patterns by age, although the increase in younger women tended to extend to an older age. Case survival was unchanged between the diagnostic periods 1977–1981 and 1982–1987 and there was little change in the proportion of cases that were adeno‐carcinomas.

LanguageEnglish
Pages193-196
Number of pages4
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1989
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

@article{fdf47314ccb04c4aadc0ece9a9688d8c,
title = "Cervical Cancer in South Australia: Trends in Incidence, Mortality and Case Survival",
abstract = "Summary: Approximately 90{\%} of cervical cancers are considered preventable through regular screening and the treatment of precursor lesions, but fewer than 20{\%} of South Australian women were found to have been screened in 1984. Data from the State Cancer Registry have shown an increase in cervical cancer incidence of approximately 80{\%} in women under 50 years of age in the 9‐year period to 1986, but a decrease of about 25{\%} in older women. Mortality data have shown similar patterns by age, although the increase in younger women tended to extend to an older age. Case survival was unchanged between the diagnostic periods 1977–1981 and 1982–1987 and there was little change in the proportion of cases that were adeno‐carcinomas.",
author = "A. Bonett and M. Davy and D. Roder",
year = "1989",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1479-828X.1989.tb01717.x",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "193--196",
journal = "Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology",
issn = "0004-8666",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

Cervical Cancer in South Australia : Trends in Incidence, Mortality and Case Survival. / Bonett, A.; Davy, M.; Roder, D.

In: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.01.1989, p. 193-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cervical Cancer in South Australia

T2 - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

AU - Bonett, A.

AU - Davy, M.

AU - Roder, D.

PY - 1989/1/1

Y1 - 1989/1/1

N2 - Summary: Approximately 90% of cervical cancers are considered preventable through regular screening and the treatment of precursor lesions, but fewer than 20% of South Australian women were found to have been screened in 1984. Data from the State Cancer Registry have shown an increase in cervical cancer incidence of approximately 80% in women under 50 years of age in the 9‐year period to 1986, but a decrease of about 25% in older women. Mortality data have shown similar patterns by age, although the increase in younger women tended to extend to an older age. Case survival was unchanged between the diagnostic periods 1977–1981 and 1982–1987 and there was little change in the proportion of cases that were adeno‐carcinomas.

AB - Summary: Approximately 90% of cervical cancers are considered preventable through regular screening and the treatment of precursor lesions, but fewer than 20% of South Australian women were found to have been screened in 1984. Data from the State Cancer Registry have shown an increase in cervical cancer incidence of approximately 80% in women under 50 years of age in the 9‐year period to 1986, but a decrease of about 25% in older women. Mortality data have shown similar patterns by age, although the increase in younger women tended to extend to an older age. Case survival was unchanged between the diagnostic periods 1977–1981 and 1982–1987 and there was little change in the proportion of cases that were adeno‐carcinomas.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024457066&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1479-828X.1989.tb01717.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1479-828X.1989.tb01717.x

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 193

EP - 196

JO - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

JF - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

SN - 0004-8666

IS - 3

ER -