Body mass index, waist hip ratio, and waist circumference: Which measure to classify obesity?

Tiffany Gill, Catherine Chittleborough, Anne Taylor, Richard Ruffin, David Wilson, Patrick Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the proportion of a representative population sample of adults in South Australia who have a body mass index (a measure of overall obesity) classified as normal or underweight, but who also have a waist circumference or waist hip ratio (measures of central obesity) that indicates obesity. Methods: A representative population sample of adults aged 18 years and over living in the north west region of Adelaide (n = 2523) were recruited to the study. Clinical measures of height, weight, waist and hip circumference were obtained and used to determine body mass index, waist hip ratio and waist circumference. Results: Among women with a normal body mass index, 19.0 % had a high waist circumference (≥ 80 cm) and 8.5 % had a high waist hip ratio (> 0.85). Among males with a normal body mass index, 3.4 % had a high waist circumference (≥ 95 cm) and 0.1 % had a high waist hip ratio (>1.0). Conclusions: Body mass index, waist hip ratio and waist circumference all have a role in the identification of those who are obese or overweight.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-200
Number of pages10
JournalSozial- und Praventivmedizin
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Keywords

  • Abdominal obesity
  • Anthropometry
  • Body mass index
  • Central obesity
  • Height
  • Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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