Basal insulin and cardiovascular and other outcomes in dysglycemia

The Origin Trial Investigators, Hertzel C. Gerstein, Jackie Bosch, Gilles R. Dagenais, Rafael Díaz, Hyejung Jung, Aldo P. Maggioni, Janice Pogue, Jeffrey Probstfield, Ambady Ramachandran, Matthew C. Riddle, Lars E. Rydén, Salim Yusuf, L. Richardson, R. Diaz, P. Johnston, R. Vige, K. Birkeland, A. Budaj, E. Cardona & 31 others I. Chazova, P. Commerford, L. Danilova, M. Davies, R. Fernando, G. Fodor, R. Gilbert, R. Gomis, N. Hâncu, M. Hanefeld, P. Hildebrandt, G. Kacerovsky-Bielesz, M. Keltai, J. H. Kim, H. Krum, H. Kültürsay, F. Lanas, B. S. Lewis, E. Lonn, P. López-Jaramillo, J. Marin-Neto, M. Marre, R. McKelvie, M. McQueen, I. Mendoza, C. Morillo, C. Pan, V. Pīrāgs, V. Profozic, R. Ratner, Phil Aylward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

991 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The provision of sufficient basal insulin to normalize fasting plasma glucose levels may reduce cardiovascular events, but such a possibility has not been formally tested. Methods: We randomly assigned 12,537 people (mean age, 63.5 years) with cardiovascular risk factors plus impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or type 2 diabetes to receive insulin glargine (with a target fasting blood glucose level of ≤95 mg per deciliter [5.3 mmol per liter]) or standard care and to receive n-3 fatty acids or placebo with the use of a 2-by-2 factorial design. The results of the comparison between insulin glargine and standard care are reported here. The coprimary outcomes were nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes and these events plus revascularization or hospitalization for heart failure. Microvascular outcomes, incident diabetes, hypoglycemia, weight, and cancers were also compared between groups. Results: The median follow-up was 6.2 years (interquartile range, 5.8 to 6.7). Rates of incident cardiovascular outcomes were similar in the insulin-glargine and standard-care groups: 2.94 and 2.85 per 100 person-years, respectively, for the first coprimary outcome (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94 to 1.11; P = 0.63) and 5.52 and 5.28 per 100 person-years, respectively, for the second coprimary outcome (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.11; P = 0.27). New diabetes was diagnosed approximately 3 months after therapy was stopped among 30% versus 35% of 1456 participants without baseline diabetes (odds ratio, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.00; P = 0.05). Rates of severe hypoglycemia were 1.00 versus 0.31 per 100 person-years. Median weight increased by 1.6 kg in the insulin-glargine group and fell by 0.5 kg in the standard-care group. There was no significant difference in cancers (hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.13; P = 0.97). Conclusions: When used to target normal fasting plasma glucose levels for more than 6 years, insulin glargine had a neutral effect on cardiovascular outcomes and cancers. Although it reduced new-onset diabetes, insulin glargine also increased hypoglycemia and modestly increased weight.

LanguageEnglish
Pages319-328
Number of pages10
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume367
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jul 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The Origin Trial Investigators. / Basal insulin and cardiovascular and other outcomes in dysglycemia. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 367, No. 4. pp. 319-328.
@article{f8cd562416174ca493f3c9e4d4b8a2d4,
title = "Basal insulin and cardiovascular and other outcomes in dysglycemia",
abstract = "Background: The provision of sufficient basal insulin to normalize fasting plasma glucose levels may reduce cardiovascular events, but such a possibility has not been formally tested. Methods: We randomly assigned 12,537 people (mean age, 63.5 years) with cardiovascular risk factors plus impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or type 2 diabetes to receive insulin glargine (with a target fasting blood glucose level of ≤95 mg per deciliter [5.3 mmol per liter]) or standard care and to receive n-3 fatty acids or placebo with the use of a 2-by-2 factorial design. The results of the comparison between insulin glargine and standard care are reported here. The coprimary outcomes were nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes and these events plus revascularization or hospitalization for heart failure. Microvascular outcomes, incident diabetes, hypoglycemia, weight, and cancers were also compared between groups. Results: The median follow-up was 6.2 years (interquartile range, 5.8 to 6.7). Rates of incident cardiovascular outcomes were similar in the insulin-glargine and standard-care groups: 2.94 and 2.85 per 100 person-years, respectively, for the first coprimary outcome (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.94 to 1.11; P = 0.63) and 5.52 and 5.28 per 100 person-years, respectively, for the second coprimary outcome (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95{\%} CI, 0.97 to 1.11; P = 0.27). New diabetes was diagnosed approximately 3 months after therapy was stopped among 30{\%} versus 35{\%} of 1456 participants without baseline diabetes (odds ratio, 0.80; 95{\%} CI, 0.64 to 1.00; P = 0.05). Rates of severe hypoglycemia were 1.00 versus 0.31 per 100 person-years. Median weight increased by 1.6 kg in the insulin-glargine group and fell by 0.5 kg in the standard-care group. There was no significant difference in cancers (hazard ratio, 1.00; 95{\%} CI, 0.88 to 1.13; P = 0.97). Conclusions: When used to target normal fasting plasma glucose levels for more than 6 years, insulin glargine had a neutral effect on cardiovascular outcomes and cancers. Although it reduced new-onset diabetes, insulin glargine also increased hypoglycemia and modestly increased weight.",
author = "{The Origin Trial Investigators} and Gerstein, {Hertzel C.} and Jackie Bosch and Dagenais, {Gilles R.} and Rafael D{\'i}az and Hyejung Jung and Maggioni, {Aldo P.} and Janice Pogue and Jeffrey Probstfield and Ambady Ramachandran and Riddle, {Matthew C.} and Ryd{\'e}n, {Lars E.} and Salim Yusuf and L. Richardson and R. Diaz and P. Johnston and R. Vige and K. Birkeland and A. Budaj and E. Cardona and I. Chazova and P. Commerford and L. Danilova and M. Davies and R. Fernando and G. Fodor and R. Gilbert and R. Gomis and N. H{\^a}ncu and M. Hanefeld and P. Hildebrandt and G. Kacerovsky-Bielesz and M. Keltai and Kim, {J. H.} and H. Krum and H. K{\"u}lt{\"u}rsay and F. Lanas and Lewis, {B. S.} and E. Lonn and P. L{\'o}pez-Jaramillo and J. Marin-Neto and M. Marre and R. McKelvie and M. McQueen and I. Mendoza and C. Morillo and C. Pan and V. Pīrāgs and V. Profozic and R. Ratner and Phil Aylward",
year = "2012",
month = "7",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1056/NEJMoa1203858",
language = "English",
volume = "367",
pages = "319--328",
journal = "New England Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0028-4793",
publisher = "Massachussetts Medical Society",
number = "4",

}

Basal insulin and cardiovascular and other outcomes in dysglycemia. / The Origin Trial Investigators.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 367, No. 4, 26.07.2012, p. 319-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Basal insulin and cardiovascular and other outcomes in dysglycemia

AU - The Origin Trial Investigators

AU - Gerstein, Hertzel C.

AU - Bosch, Jackie

AU - Dagenais, Gilles R.

AU - Díaz, Rafael

AU - Jung, Hyejung

AU - Maggioni, Aldo P.

AU - Pogue, Janice

AU - Probstfield, Jeffrey

AU - Ramachandran, Ambady

AU - Riddle, Matthew C.

AU - Rydén, Lars E.

AU - Yusuf, Salim

AU - Richardson, L.

AU - Diaz, R.

AU - Johnston, P.

AU - Vige, R.

AU - Birkeland, K.

AU - Budaj, A.

AU - Cardona, E.

AU - Chazova, I.

AU - Commerford, P.

AU - Danilova, L.

AU - Davies, M.

AU - Fernando, R.

AU - Fodor, G.

AU - Gilbert, R.

AU - Gomis, R.

AU - Hâncu, N.

AU - Hanefeld, M.

AU - Hildebrandt, P.

AU - Kacerovsky-Bielesz, G.

AU - Keltai, M.

AU - Kim, J. H.

AU - Krum, H.

AU - Kültürsay, H.

AU - Lanas, F.

AU - Lewis, B. S.

AU - Lonn, E.

AU - López-Jaramillo, P.

AU - Marin-Neto, J.

AU - Marre, M.

AU - McKelvie, R.

AU - McQueen, M.

AU - Mendoza, I.

AU - Morillo, C.

AU - Pan, C.

AU - Pīrāgs, V.

AU - Profozic, V.

AU - Ratner, R.

AU - Aylward, Phil

PY - 2012/7/26

Y1 - 2012/7/26

N2 - Background: The provision of sufficient basal insulin to normalize fasting plasma glucose levels may reduce cardiovascular events, but such a possibility has not been formally tested. Methods: We randomly assigned 12,537 people (mean age, 63.5 years) with cardiovascular risk factors plus impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or type 2 diabetes to receive insulin glargine (with a target fasting blood glucose level of ≤95 mg per deciliter [5.3 mmol per liter]) or standard care and to receive n-3 fatty acids or placebo with the use of a 2-by-2 factorial design. The results of the comparison between insulin glargine and standard care are reported here. The coprimary outcomes were nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes and these events plus revascularization or hospitalization for heart failure. Microvascular outcomes, incident diabetes, hypoglycemia, weight, and cancers were also compared between groups. Results: The median follow-up was 6.2 years (interquartile range, 5.8 to 6.7). Rates of incident cardiovascular outcomes were similar in the insulin-glargine and standard-care groups: 2.94 and 2.85 per 100 person-years, respectively, for the first coprimary outcome (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94 to 1.11; P = 0.63) and 5.52 and 5.28 per 100 person-years, respectively, for the second coprimary outcome (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.11; P = 0.27). New diabetes was diagnosed approximately 3 months after therapy was stopped among 30% versus 35% of 1456 participants without baseline diabetes (odds ratio, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.00; P = 0.05). Rates of severe hypoglycemia were 1.00 versus 0.31 per 100 person-years. Median weight increased by 1.6 kg in the insulin-glargine group and fell by 0.5 kg in the standard-care group. There was no significant difference in cancers (hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.13; P = 0.97). Conclusions: When used to target normal fasting plasma glucose levels for more than 6 years, insulin glargine had a neutral effect on cardiovascular outcomes and cancers. Although it reduced new-onset diabetes, insulin glargine also increased hypoglycemia and modestly increased weight.

AB - Background: The provision of sufficient basal insulin to normalize fasting plasma glucose levels may reduce cardiovascular events, but such a possibility has not been formally tested. Methods: We randomly assigned 12,537 people (mean age, 63.5 years) with cardiovascular risk factors plus impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or type 2 diabetes to receive insulin glargine (with a target fasting blood glucose level of ≤95 mg per deciliter [5.3 mmol per liter]) or standard care and to receive n-3 fatty acids or placebo with the use of a 2-by-2 factorial design. The results of the comparison between insulin glargine and standard care are reported here. The coprimary outcomes were nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes and these events plus revascularization or hospitalization for heart failure. Microvascular outcomes, incident diabetes, hypoglycemia, weight, and cancers were also compared between groups. Results: The median follow-up was 6.2 years (interquartile range, 5.8 to 6.7). Rates of incident cardiovascular outcomes were similar in the insulin-glargine and standard-care groups: 2.94 and 2.85 per 100 person-years, respectively, for the first coprimary outcome (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94 to 1.11; P = 0.63) and 5.52 and 5.28 per 100 person-years, respectively, for the second coprimary outcome (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.11; P = 0.27). New diabetes was diagnosed approximately 3 months after therapy was stopped among 30% versus 35% of 1456 participants without baseline diabetes (odds ratio, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.00; P = 0.05). Rates of severe hypoglycemia were 1.00 versus 0.31 per 100 person-years. Median weight increased by 1.6 kg in the insulin-glargine group and fell by 0.5 kg in the standard-care group. There was no significant difference in cancers (hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.13; P = 0.97). Conclusions: When used to target normal fasting plasma glucose levels for more than 6 years, insulin glargine had a neutral effect on cardiovascular outcomes and cancers. Although it reduced new-onset diabetes, insulin glargine also increased hypoglycemia and modestly increased weight.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84864270406&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1056/NEJMoa1203858

DO - 10.1056/NEJMoa1203858

M3 - Article

VL - 367

SP - 319

EP - 328

JO - New England Journal of Medicine

T2 - New England Journal of Medicine

JF - New England Journal of Medicine

SN - 0028-4793

IS - 4

ER -