Assessing the Quality of the Management of Tonsillitis among Australian Children: A Population-Based Sample Survey

Peter Hibbert, Jacqueline Stephens, Carl de Wet, Helena Williams, Andrew Hallahan, Gavin R. Wheaton, Chris Dalton, Hsuen P. Ting, Gaston Arnolda, Jeffrey Braithwaite

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aims of this study were twofold: (1) to design and validate a set of clinical indicators of appropriate care for tonsillitis and (2) to measure the level of tonsillitis care that is in line with guideline recommendations in a sample of Australian children. Study Design: A set of tonsillitis care indicators was developed from available national and international guidelines and validated in 4 stages. This research used the same design as the CareTrack Kids study, which was described in detail elsewhere. Setting: Samples of patient records from general practices, emergency departments, and hospital admissions were assessed. Subjects and Methods: Patient records of children aged 0 to 15 years were assessed for the presence of, and adherence to, the indicators for care delivered in 2012 and 2013. Results: Eleven indicators were developed. The records of 821 children (mean age, 5.0 years; SD, 4.0) with tonsillitis were screened. The reviewers conducted 2354 eligible indicator assessments across 1127 visits. Adherence to 6 indicators could be assessed and ranged from 14.3% to 73.2% (interquartile range 31.5% to 72.2%). Conclusion: Our main findings are consistent with the international literature: the treatment of many children who present with confirmed or suspected tonsillitis is inconsistent with current guidelines. Future research should consider how the indicators could be applied in a structured and automated manner to increase the reliability and efficiency of record reviews and help raise clinicians’ awareness of appropriate tonsillitis management.

LanguageEnglish
Pages137-144
Number of pages8
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States)
Volume160
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • child health
  • guideline adherence
  • health care quality indicators
  • patient safety
  • tonsillitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Hibbert, Peter ; Stephens, Jacqueline ; de Wet, Carl ; Williams, Helena ; Hallahan, Andrew ; Wheaton, Gavin R. ; Dalton, Chris ; Ting, Hsuen P. ; Arnolda, Gaston ; Braithwaite, Jeffrey. / Assessing the Quality of the Management of Tonsillitis among Australian Children : A Population-Based Sample Survey. In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States). 2019 ; Vol. 160, No. 1. pp. 137-144.
@article{d83d351cfdf54d4ca3a67b03f56e3e06,
title = "Assessing the Quality of the Management of Tonsillitis among Australian Children: A Population-Based Sample Survey",
abstract = "Objective: The aims of this study were twofold: (1) to design and validate a set of clinical indicators of appropriate care for tonsillitis and (2) to measure the level of tonsillitis care that is in line with guideline recommendations in a sample of Australian children. Study Design: A set of tonsillitis care indicators was developed from available national and international guidelines and validated in 4 stages. This research used the same design as the CareTrack Kids study, which was described in detail elsewhere. Setting: Samples of patient records from general practices, emergency departments, and hospital admissions were assessed. Subjects and Methods: Patient records of children aged 0 to 15 years were assessed for the presence of, and adherence to, the indicators for care delivered in 2012 and 2013. Results: Eleven indicators were developed. The records of 821 children (mean age, 5.0 years; SD, 4.0) with tonsillitis were screened. The reviewers conducted 2354 eligible indicator assessments across 1127 visits. Adherence to 6 indicators could be assessed and ranged from 14.3{\%} to 73.2{\%} (interquartile range 31.5{\%} to 72.2{\%}). Conclusion: Our main findings are consistent with the international literature: the treatment of many children who present with confirmed or suspected tonsillitis is inconsistent with current guidelines. Future research should consider how the indicators could be applied in a structured and automated manner to increase the reliability and efficiency of record reviews and help raise clinicians’ awareness of appropriate tonsillitis management.",
keywords = "child health, guideline adherence, health care quality indicators, patient safety, tonsillitis",
author = "Peter Hibbert and Jacqueline Stephens and {de Wet}, Carl and Helena Williams and Andrew Hallahan and Wheaton, {Gavin R.} and Chris Dalton and Ting, {Hsuen P.} and Gaston Arnolda and Jeffrey Braithwaite",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0194599818796137",
language = "English",
volume = "160",
pages = "137--144",
journal = "Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery",
issn = "0194-5998",
number = "1",

}

Hibbert, P, Stephens, J, de Wet, C, Williams, H, Hallahan, A, Wheaton, GR, Dalton, C, Ting, HP, Arnolda, G & Braithwaite, J 2019, 'Assessing the Quality of the Management of Tonsillitis among Australian Children: A Population-Based Sample Survey', Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States), vol. 160, no. 1, pp. 137-144. https://doi.org/10.1177/0194599818796137

Assessing the Quality of the Management of Tonsillitis among Australian Children : A Population-Based Sample Survey. / Hibbert, Peter; Stephens, Jacqueline; de Wet, Carl; Williams, Helena; Hallahan, Andrew; Wheaton, Gavin R.; Dalton, Chris; Ting, Hsuen P.; Arnolda, Gaston; Braithwaite, Jeffrey.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States), Vol. 160, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 137-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing the Quality of the Management of Tonsillitis among Australian Children

T2 - Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

AU - Hibbert, Peter

AU - Stephens, Jacqueline

AU - de Wet, Carl

AU - Williams, Helena

AU - Hallahan, Andrew

AU - Wheaton, Gavin R.

AU - Dalton, Chris

AU - Ting, Hsuen P.

AU - Arnolda, Gaston

AU - Braithwaite, Jeffrey

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: The aims of this study were twofold: (1) to design and validate a set of clinical indicators of appropriate care for tonsillitis and (2) to measure the level of tonsillitis care that is in line with guideline recommendations in a sample of Australian children. Study Design: A set of tonsillitis care indicators was developed from available national and international guidelines and validated in 4 stages. This research used the same design as the CareTrack Kids study, which was described in detail elsewhere. Setting: Samples of patient records from general practices, emergency departments, and hospital admissions were assessed. Subjects and Methods: Patient records of children aged 0 to 15 years were assessed for the presence of, and adherence to, the indicators for care delivered in 2012 and 2013. Results: Eleven indicators were developed. The records of 821 children (mean age, 5.0 years; SD, 4.0) with tonsillitis were screened. The reviewers conducted 2354 eligible indicator assessments across 1127 visits. Adherence to 6 indicators could be assessed and ranged from 14.3% to 73.2% (interquartile range 31.5% to 72.2%). Conclusion: Our main findings are consistent with the international literature: the treatment of many children who present with confirmed or suspected tonsillitis is inconsistent with current guidelines. Future research should consider how the indicators could be applied in a structured and automated manner to increase the reliability and efficiency of record reviews and help raise clinicians’ awareness of appropriate tonsillitis management.

AB - Objective: The aims of this study were twofold: (1) to design and validate a set of clinical indicators of appropriate care for tonsillitis and (2) to measure the level of tonsillitis care that is in line with guideline recommendations in a sample of Australian children. Study Design: A set of tonsillitis care indicators was developed from available national and international guidelines and validated in 4 stages. This research used the same design as the CareTrack Kids study, which was described in detail elsewhere. Setting: Samples of patient records from general practices, emergency departments, and hospital admissions were assessed. Subjects and Methods: Patient records of children aged 0 to 15 years were assessed for the presence of, and adherence to, the indicators for care delivered in 2012 and 2013. Results: Eleven indicators were developed. The records of 821 children (mean age, 5.0 years; SD, 4.0) with tonsillitis were screened. The reviewers conducted 2354 eligible indicator assessments across 1127 visits. Adherence to 6 indicators could be assessed and ranged from 14.3% to 73.2% (interquartile range 31.5% to 72.2%). Conclusion: Our main findings are consistent with the international literature: the treatment of many children who present with confirmed or suspected tonsillitis is inconsistent with current guidelines. Future research should consider how the indicators could be applied in a structured and automated manner to increase the reliability and efficiency of record reviews and help raise clinicians’ awareness of appropriate tonsillitis management.

KW - child health

KW - guideline adherence

KW - health care quality indicators

KW - patient safety

KW - tonsillitis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053406658&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0194599818796137

DO - 10.1177/0194599818796137

M3 - Article

VL - 160

SP - 137

EP - 144

JO - Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

JF - Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

SN - 0194-5998

IS - 1

ER -