Assessing heavy episodic drinking: A random survey of 18 to 34-year-olds in four cities in four different continents

Anne W. Taylor, Bridgette M. Bewick, Qian Ling, Valentina Kirzhanova, Paulo Alterwain, Eleonora Dal Grande, Graeme Tucker, Alfred B. Makanjuola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Heavy episodic drinking (HED) can have health and social consequences. This study assesses the associations between HED and demographic, socioeconomic, motivation and effects indicators for people aged 18–34 years old living in four cities in different regions of the world. Method: Multistage random sampling was consistent across the four cities (Ilorin (Nigeria), Wuhan (China), Montevideo (Uruguay) and Moscow (Russia)). The questionnaire was forward/back translated and face-to-face interviewing was undertaken. A total of 6235 interviews were undertaken in 2014. Separate univariable and multivariable modelling was undertaken to determine the best predictors of HED. Results: HED prevalence was 9.0%. The best predictors differed for each city. The higher probability of HED in the final models included beliefs that they have reached adulthood, feeling relaxed as an effect of drinking alcohol, and forgetting problems as an effect of drinking alcohol. Lower probability of HED was associated with not being interested in alcohol as a reason for limiting alcohol, and the belief that drinking alcohol is too expensive or a waste of money. Conclusion: Although some indicators were common across the four cities, the variables included in the final models predominantly differed from city to city. The need for country-specific prevention and early intervention programs are warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Article number706
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Alcohol
  • Heavy episodic drinking
  • Ilorin
  • Montevideo
  • Moscow
  • Survey
  • Wuhan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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