Are Stage of Change constructs relevant for subjective oral health in a vulnerable population?

Lisa M. Jamieson, E. J. Parker, J. Broughton, H. P. Lawrence, Jason Armfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Stage of Change constructs may be proxy markers of psychosocial health which, in turn, are related to oral health. Objective: To determine if Stage of Change constructs were associated with subjective oral health in a population at heightened risk of dental disease. Methods: Stage of Change constructs were developed from a validated 18-item scale and categorised into ‘Pre-contemplative’, ‘Contemplative’ and ‘Active’. A convenience sample of 446 Australian non-Aboriginal women pregnant by an Aboriginal male (age range 14–43 years) provided data to evaluate the outcome variables (self-rated oral health and oral health impairment), the Stage of Change constructs and socio-demographic, behavioural and access-related factors. Factors significant at the p<0.05 level in bivariate analysis were entered into prevalence regression models. Results: Approximately 54% of participants had fair/poor self-rated oral health and 34% had oral health impairment. Around 12% were ‘Pre-contemplative’, 46% ‘Contemplative’ and 42% ‘Active’. Being either ‘pre-contemplative’ or ‘contemplative’ was associated with poor self-rated oral health after adjusting for socio-demographic factors. ‘Pre-contemplative’ ceased being significant after adjusting for dentate status and dental behaviour. ‘Pre-contemplative’ remained significant when adjusting for dental cost, but not ‘Contemplative’. The Stages of Change constructs ceased being associated with self-rated oral health after adjusting for all confounders. Only ‘Contemplative’ (reference: ‘Active’) was a risk indicator in the null model for oral health impairment which persisted after adding dentate status, dental behaviour and dental cost variables, but not socio-demographics. When adjusting for all confounders, ‘Contemplative’ was not a risk indicator for oral health impairment. Conclusions: Both the ‘Pre-contemplative’ and ‘Contemplative’ Stage of Change constructs were associated with poor self-rated oral health and oral health impairment after adjusting for some, but not all, covariates. When considered as a proxy marker of psychosocial health, Stage of Change constructs may have some relevance for subjective oral health.

LanguageEnglish
Pages111-116
Number of pages6
JournalCommunity Dental Health
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aboriginal
  • Australia
  • Oral health
  • Pregnancy
  • Stage of change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Jamieson, Lisa M. ; Parker, E. J. ; Broughton, J. ; Lawrence, H. P. ; Armfield, Jason. / Are Stage of Change constructs relevant for subjective oral health in a vulnerable population?. In: Community Dental Health. 2014 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 111-116.
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Are Stage of Change constructs relevant for subjective oral health in a vulnerable population? / Jamieson, Lisa M.; Parker, E. J.; Broughton, J.; Lawrence, H. P.; Armfield, Jason.

In: Community Dental Health, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 111-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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